Concurrent Sessions

DAY ONE

Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 11:05am - 11:30am

CARE - Building remote community capacity through training in aged care – Presented by Jessica Hawkins, Pam McLennan & Natalie Ellis

Authors

Kim Hawkins, Pam McLennan, Jessica Hawkins

Overview

The Northern Territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Training Project (NTTP) is a collaborative project between Charles Darwin University and remote communities in the Northern Territory (funded by the Australian Government Department of Health). The program started in 2009 and delivers culturally appropriate and community led training for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce employed in services in rural and remote communities across the Northern Territory. The initiative was developed to improve the capacity, quality and mix of the health workforce. Primarily to increase the supply of Indigenous and remote community health workers and facilitate a more even distribution of workforce in terms of geography and of the types of services provided. It also aims to support the Indigenous health workforce in the face of an aging population and to address the health workforce shortages in regional, rural and remote Australia.

Given the unique social and cultural circumstances of the diverse communities involved and the vast distances covered by trainers this project has adopted a community-by-community approach to training methods and extensive consultations with stakeholders and service users to ensure the sustainability of the collaboration. Outcomes for this initiative are for the whole community and specific to the community in which the training is delivered. This means each program is delivered in a unique way and influenced by the activities, desires and values of community leaders and those using aged care services.

CDU staff deliver training for this initiative at functioning aged-care facilities in remote communities with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workers employed at the facility. The nature of remote community work means trainers are required to be flexible in their delivery, able to operate with minimal support, reduced technical requirement and within constrains of community priorities.

The training environment also includes a range of learning styles and levels of literacy, numeracy and specific cultural, community and family priorities. To support this, English language, literacy and numeracy training is integrated into training on a case-by-case basis. This collaboration goes above and beyond the standard practise in training and skills development though the unique community focus of its delivery.

As trainees are currently employed in community aged care services and many have family and community commitments, CDU staff support access to training by delivering on community, cooking meals for participants, assisting with cleaning and chores and reducing barriers that may prevent trainees from attending skills development programs. The collaboration is well regarded due to the trainer’s ability to contextualise training delivery to suit audiences and to provide results for participants quite often in challenging circumstances. The flexibility of training is key, and CDU work very hard to ensure community needs are met. With the expansion of health qualifications to include allied health, CDU are keen to see how this training can be replicated to broaden the health workforce needs.

These Certificate qualifications can open pathways to further roles in healthcare and person-centred services and increases the skills required to offer day-to-day support of individuals in community settings.

Presenters

Pam McLennan

Pam McLennan

Pam is an experienced Trainer from CDU that co-ordinates the Northern Territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Training Project (NTTP). With a strong background in the aged care sector Pam visits many communities to provide training and is extremely well-respected.

Pam has developed an excellent rapport and training ability that engages staff in all aspects of learning and study in a respectful and culturally appropriate manner. Pam has a strong interest and experience in palliative care models and dementia. Pam advocates for a model of flexibility and strengths-based delivery in the learning environment, and believes the key to success is through the establishment of trust and transparency with Elders in the community. Pam's motivation comes from being able to empower students and watching the strengths in giving back to community.
Jessica Hawkins

Jessica Hawkins

Jessica is currently a Trainer at CDU, and has worked in the health and aged care industry for a number of years in a variety of settings. Jessica holds qualifications in both nursing and paramedical science, and is the CDU representative on the Stakeholder Group that are introducing the Allied Health Academy model in the Northern Territory. Jessica has been involved in putting together a program that will meet the needs of both future students and industry. Jessica has a strong health background and has also been part of the remote training program delivered across communities within the NT. This experience has enabled Jessica to consider learning styles and approaches to building on existing skills and knowledge.
Natalie Ellis

Natalie Ellis

Natalie Ellis has been employed with CDU for fifteen years, primarily as Indigenous
Student Support Officer. Natalie is currently seconded with the CDU Community
Services team and is involved with the remote training program delivered across the
Katherine region in the NT. Natalie’s Aboriginal origins are with the Dalabon people of
Central Arnhem Land. Her experiences and knowledge with Aboriginal communities
in the Top End of NT are invaluable when developing and delivering training to these
communities. Natalie is a strong believer in equipping individuals and communities with
the skills and knowledge that will empower them to take control of their own destinies.
Outcomes in these learning areas can only be achieved by building relationships and
trust and having a clear understanding of the needs of the people.
CULTURES - Moorditj Djena: A Strong Step Forward – Presented by Renae Hilder & Susan Jetta

Overview

‘Moorditj Djena is a high-risk foot and diabetes education service which focuses on prevention and management of foot complications that result from poorly controlled chronic diseases e.g. diabetes, peripheral arterial disease and peripheral neuropathy for Aboriginal people.  It was identified in 2011 that there were no podiatry services provided within the Perth metropolitan area that specifically targeted the Aboriginal population. Evidence showed that diagnosis of conditions such as diabetes and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) as well as the amputation rate for the Aboriginal community within WA, was significantly higher than for non-Aboriginal people. Access to education, screening and preventative podiatry services by this client group was also limited. The need to identify those at high risk of foot problems and amputations early, particularly those as a result of chronic conditions, such as diabetes or PVD, was a high priority. Once these clients were identified, they required easy access to ongoing regular routine preventative podiatry care, education and timely referral to specialist services.

Through the Moorditj Djena Program, clients receive culturally appropriate podiatry and diabetes education services at various community clinics across the metropolitan area in a combination of community venues and using two customised mobile clinic vans.  The Moorditj Djena team provide and support a holistic approach to improving Aboriginal health by working with the Aboriginal community and other relevant health and community agencies.  Many of the clinic locations are in partnership with other agencies and stakeholders providing services to Aboriginal people, resulting in a shared care approach.

The focus of the service is to identify and manage risk factors related to foot health and diabetes, initiate recall systems and provide intervention and referrals relative to risk category.  When a client attends the Moorditj Djena Service, the Aboriginal Health Professional provides biometric feedback, health education and social support.  The Aboriginal Health Professional refers the client to the Senior Podiatrist, Senior Dietitian and/or Diabetes Educator.  Referrals to other culturally appropriate health and social services are also provided as required.

Presenters

Renae Hilder

Renae Hilder

Renae Hilder has worked in the area of Aboriginal Health for over 20 years and worked in the remote area of Wiluna and surrounding Aboriginal communities for 7 years. Renae has an Honours degree in Psychology and a Postgraduate Diploma in Health Promotion and is passionate about ensuring equity in access to high quality health and social services for all Australians.

Renae is the Coordinator of the multi-disciplinary Moorditj Djena Team that provides podiatry and diabetes education to Aboriginal people in the Perth metropolitan area.'
Susan Jetta

Susan Jetta

Susan Jetta is a proud Aboriginal Elder from the Ballardong region of the Wheatbelt area of Western Australia. Susan was recently named Elder of the year at the 2017 Midland NAIDOC Awards. Susan has been employed with the Department of Health for a period of six years and is currently working with East Metropolitan Health Service (EMHS) Community and Population Health as an Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer in the Moorditj Djena (Strong Feet) team. Moorditj Djena is an Aboriginal specific mobile Podiatry and Diabetes Outreach Service based in Midland and is a high-risk foot and diabetes education service focusing on prevention and management of foot complications that result from poorly controlled chronic diseases such as diabetes, peripheral arterial disease and peripheral neuropathy.

Susan works as part of a team to provide primary health care and health promotion services to the Aboriginal Community in the EMHS catchment area. Susan’s role includes providing health consultations, health education, primary health care network referrals, care coordination and health promotion services to the community whilst encouraging clients to self-manage their chronic condition. Susan actively encourages and supports clients/families/communities to engage in activities which maximises health.
In the future, Susan hopes there will be more male Aboriginal Health Workers to create more of a gender balance for cultural security in Aboriginal specific self-management programs.

Susan is currently studying an Aboriginal Leadership Program (Certificate IV in Leadership and Mentoring) at South Metropolitan TAFE in Fremantle.
CONNECTION - Interdisciplinary paediatric allied health services for urban Indigenous Australian children – Presented By Natalie Kneubuhler & Katy Curtain

Authors

Natalie Kneubuhler, Katy Curtain, Megan L Mitchell, Vanessa Smith

Overview

The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) has drawn on holistic frameworks to develop a paediatric occupational therapy (OT) and speech pathology (SP) model of care, which guides allied health professionals to deliver culturally responsive services to urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.  The IUIH Paediatric Allied Health team developed using an interdisciplinary model, and this has been instrumental in providing a meaningful and appropriate therapy service for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and their families.

The aim of this presentation is to outline the provision of IUIH paediatric occupational therapy and speech pathology services in Indigenous Community Controlled Health Services as a practical example of the implementation of collaborative, client focused and inter-professional model of care. This will comprise the holistic frameworks that guide our practices, and the practical characteristics of our services including:

  • The clinical systems which support connections between OT and SP services such as joint appointments, joint medical note writing, shared office time for planning of both individual client sessions and coordination of clinic services
  • The tools and practices that support connections between OT and SP services and their clients, including joint informal assessment practices such as yarning and play based assessment, joint goal setting, and collaborative outcome measures.
  • Connections between OT and SP and other primary health staff as part of an integrated and comprehensive approach to primary health care. These connections are built on genuine relationships, understanding of roles and multidisciplinary team practices such as team meetings and case conferences.
  • Frameworks that guide ongoing collaboration and reciprocal knowledge sharing. These frameworks support connections with clients’ and family’s ways of knowing, being and doing.

The above-mentioned features and practices of this team’s model of care have resulted in positive attendance, community feedback and holistic, meaningful outcomes across numerous Indigenous Community Controlled Health Services. The IUIH Paediatric Allied Health model of care can be seen as a practical example of delivering culturally responsive services to urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Presenters

Natalie Kneubuhler

Natalie Kneubuhler

Natalie Kneubuhler is a proud Kuku Yalanji woman from the rural town of Innisfail in Far North Queensland. She completed her degree at the University of the Sunshine Coast, graduating with a Bachelor of Occupational Therapy in 2016. In January 2017, Natalie was employed as an Occupational Therapist at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, where she works with both adults and children. Natalie takes a holistic approach to health care, a key part of occupational therapy practice that aligns well with the Aboriginal view of health. Natalie values the importance of kinship, collaboration and cultural responsiveness in achieving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Natalie also hopes to inspire other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider a career in health as she believes this is an essential part of Closing the Gap.

Katy Curtin

Katy Curtin

Katy Curtain graduated from the Master of Speech Language Pathology at the University of Sydney in 2014 (MSLP), and is a certified practicing speech pathologist at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH). Katy practiced as a speech pathologist in Sydney with paediatric caseloads in both private and public services before making the move to Queensland to work for IUIH in 2016. Katy is dedicated to delivering health services that are family-centred and culturally responsive. She is driven to promote the principles of primary health care in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and enjoys working with and learning from clients and their families.
COLLABORATION - Rehabilitation for Aboriginal people with communication disorders after stroke – Presented by Natalie Ciccone & Chantelle Timmins

Authors

Natalie Ciccone, Elizabeth Armstrong, Deborah Hersh, Mick Adams, Meaghan McAllister, Chantelle Timmins
Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia

Background and rationale

Aboriginal Australians experience stroke up to 3 times more frequently than non-Aboriginal Australians. However, they are less likely to be admitted to stroke units and Aboriginal people are under-represented in ongoing rehabilitation services. There are currently no culturally sensitive rehabilitation treatment protocols available, and health service providers lack confidence in providing services to Aboriginal stroke survivors. This presentation will provide an overview of and preliminary results from the Wangi (talking) project (Stroke Foundation funding 2016- 2017). This project is designed to test the acceptability of a culturally tailored intervention protocol for use with Aboriginal people with acquired communication disorders (ACD) post stroke.

Methods

Up to 16 Aboriginal people with ACD post stroke are being recruited to this mixed method, multiple baseline study. The intervention involves 16 x 1 hr treatment sessions provided twice weekly. It utilises a collaborative approach to planning, integrates a yarning framework and family involvement, is provided by a speech pathologist together with an Aboriginal Co-Worker and takes place at a mutually agreed upon location. Participant acceptability is measured through an analysis of participant attendance and participant satisfaction questionnaires completed after the intervention period. Acceptability, from the perspective of the Aboriginal Co-Worker and the Speech Pathologists providing the intervention, will be obtained through semi structured interviews completed after project completion. Improvement in participant communication skills is measured through change in verbal output in conversation in which a story related to a happy memory and provide an opinion on a topical issue.

Results

Preliminary results suggest the treatment is acceptable with a high level of participant attendance. Participants have noted improvements in their communication and report that key components of the program, such as working with an Aboriginal co-worker and yarning based therapy tasks, are helpful.

Conclusion

The treatment protocol provided within the Wangi project appears to be both feasible to administer and acceptable to participants. It provides direction for rehabilitation therapists who provide services to Aboriginal stroke survivors to improve quality of care.

Presenters

Natalie Ciccone

Natalie Ciccone
Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA

Natalie Ciccone is a speech pathologist and is currently the Associate Dean of Allied Health within the School of Medical and Health Sciences at Edith Cowan University. Natalie's primary area of research interest is aphasia- a language disorder that occurs after stroke. She is the lead investigator on the Wangi (talking) project and is currently involved in two NHMRC funded projects. The first investigating very early rehabilitation for aphasia post stroke and the second evaluating the implementation of a culturally secure intervention package for Aboriginal survivors of acquired brain injury.
Chantelle Timmins

Chantelle Timmins
Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA

Chantelle Timmins is a Koorie woman from Victoria who moved to Perth around 11 years ago. She is currently studying her Bachelor of Science in Registered Nursing and she has a Diploma in Child Services. Chantelle is currently working on the Wangi project and previously worked on the Missing Voices project.
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Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 11.35am – 12 NOON

CARE - Prevalence of diabetes related foot complications in Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Australians – Matthew West & Fiona Hawke

Authors

Matthew West, Vivienne Chuter, Fiona Hawke
School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia

Background

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community has increased risk of developing chronic illness including diabetes. Among people with diabetes, foot complications are common and make a significant contribution to the morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. In 2005, the age-standardised self-reported rate of diabetes was nearly four times greater among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than among non- Indigenous Australians. The aim of this review was to systematically review the literature comparing the prevalence of diabetes-related foot complications in Indigenous Australians to their non-Indigenous peers.

Methods

The following electronic data bases were searched in August 2016: MEDLINE (January 1966 to present); EMBASE (January 1980 to present); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, latest issue); PUBMED (January 1966 to present); CINAHL (from 1982), and other sources.

Results

Eleven studies including a total of 157,892 participants were included. Studies were set in three states of Australia, mainly in rural and remote areas. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experienced substantially more diabetes related foot complications at a younger age than non-Indigenous Australians. In a clinical audit of all lower limb amputations in Western Australia there was a 38-fold higher rate of major lower limb amputation and a 27-fold higher rate of minor amputation among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 25 to 49 years of age with diabetes than non-Indigenous counterparts. In several studies, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders accounted for the vast majority of diabetes related foot complications while comprising only a small proportion of the regional population. There are no data available for some Australian states and for specific types of diabetes related foot complications.

Conclusions:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians suffer disproportionately from diabetes related lower limb complications, especially amputation. Evidence-based culturally appropriate screening and intervention programs are required to prevent widening of the gap in diabetes related foot complications between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians.

Presenters

Matthew West

Matthew West

Mr Matthew West is a Wiradjuri man and PhD candidate currently living and working on the Central Coast of NSW.

Mr West holds concurrent positions as an Associate Lecturer and Clinical Educator at the University of Newcastle and works clinically as a podiatrist at his local Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS) Eleanor Duncan Medical Centre and is a Board Member of the Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council.
Dr Fiona Hawke

Dr Fiona Hawke

Dr Fiona Hawke is a Lecturer in Podiatry at the University of Newcastle and an academic supervisor of Matthew West's PhD research.
CULTURES - Culture is Healing, Healing is Culture – Presented By Rayleen Councillor

Culture is Healing. Healing is Culture: Two Ways working from the space as Healer and Family Mediation Practitioner

Author

Rayleen Councillor

Overview

Having discussions about the two ways of practicing and working in mainstream bringing a Cultural and Spiritual perspective to the table which allows better negotiation in conflict resolution.   This approach allows Aboriginal people to maintain their own Cultural values, beliefs, protocols and ways of practicing.  This is what I do as a Karajarri working with healing from my role as a Family Mediator Practitioner.

Binyadi Nomore is an approach which was developed from the determination to honour ancestors and keep alive the spirit of resistance to oppression that was, and is embodied in actions which do not allow us to empower ourselves.  This way of working allows me to continue to work, with people of all cultures, towards a vision of a world where all persons are free and equal on their own terms.

I am an Indigenous Healer aware of current needs in our community and understand the significance of Cultural protocols and practices that we need to work in this space.  This is what I bring to the Mainstream Counselling and Family Dispute Resolution Practice in Anglicare.  Advancing Aboriginal ways of working by enhancing the policy and procedure framework.  Core to this framework is cultural safety and security.

My determination for better has taken me on a journey to gather the tools and resources for Binyadi Nomore.  This includes completing training in Master in Indigenous Knowledges (Mawul) with Yolngu learning healing through stories and music, collaborative approaches of healing and project development.  Indigenous Trauma Recovery and Indigenous Narrative Therapy.  These skills allow people to become experts of their own stories and take steps toward recovery through the many healing processes available to them.

Binyadi Nomore Ô – The Binyadi Nomore approach allows people to become experts of their own stories and take steps toward recovery.

Presenter

Rayleen Councillor

Rayleen Councillor
M.IndKn,B.AppSci,Dip.Coun,Dip.INT

After completing training in Master in Indigenous Knowledges (Mawul) with Yolngu learning healing through stories and music, collaborative approaches of healing and project development.  Binyadi Nomore was developed.

Qualified in Counselling, Family Dispute Resolution, Aboriginal Community Management and Development, Indigenous Trauma Recovery and Indigenous Narrative Therapy (Counselling, Group and Community Work).

CONNECTION - Service Learning for Lower Gulf Communities of North West QLD – Presented by Catrina Felton-Busch & Sabina Knight

Authors

Catrina M Felton-Busch, Sabina Knight

Abstract

Available evidence suggests that while Australia, has a healthy supply of allied health professionals, there is a significant geographical maldistribution of allied health professionals favouring metropolitan areas.  Reduced access to health services disadvantages rural and remote and particularly Indigenous Australians and results in poorer health outcomes compared with residents of urban areas.

There are a number of factors that encourage health professionals to practice in rural and remote areas, one of which is having had the opportunity to experience rural or remote practice as a student.

The Mount Isa Centre for Rural & Remote Health (MICRRH) as a University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), has long been involved in supporting students, particularly medicine and nursing to undertake clinical placement in North West Queensland. Now under its expanded scope and new funding arrangements MICRRH can focus on increasing opportunities for allied health student placements within our region.  More specifically into the communities of the lower Gulf of Carpentaria.

Access to allied health services for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people living in the lower Gulf of Carpentaria is provided by a combination of community-based services and outreach from Mount Isa as a regional service hub.  Difficulties with recruiting and retaining staff in these services is a common and vexing issue.  In addition, services facing the logistical challenges of providing a service within the geographical complexity of the region (small dispersed populations across vast distances) have limited opportunities to take students on placement. To overcome these limitations and as a starting point, MICRRH, working with the lower gulf community of Normanton, is using service learning, within an interprofessional framework, to not only provide a quality clinical placement for allied health students but to also address unmet need for allied health services in the community.

This presentation will explore the development of the MICRRH’s Service Learning model for Allied Health Services in the Lower Gulf Communities and report on the outcomes of the first interprofessional placement under this model.

The ultimate aim of the program is to develop work-ready allied health graduates who are passionate about rural and remote Indigenous health and who will subsequently be part of the allied health workforce providing culturally competent care in our communities.

Presenters

Catrina Felton-Busch

Catrina Felton-Busch

Catrina is an Aboriginal woman from Mornington Island with family ties to the Yangkaal and Gangalida people of the Gulf of Carpentaria. Catrina is Head of Education at the Mount Isa Centre for Rural & Remote Health, James Cook University and comes from an extensive background in Indigenous Health.
Sabina Knight

Sabina Knight

Professor Sabina Knight the Director of the Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health (MICRRH), James Cook University - comes from an extensive background in remote and Indigenous primary health care, public health and education.
YARNING - Koorliny Moort (Walking with Families) Ambulatory Care Coordination Program – Presented by Debra Rose, Paul Bell & Ciara Peake

CHILD AND ALDOESCENT HEALTH SERVICES PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL KOORLINY MOORT (Walking with Families)

Authors

Debra Rose, Paul Bell, Dr Ciara Peake

AMBULATORY CARE COORDINATION PROGRAM

Western Australia Aboriginal Children are among the most socially & economically disadvantaged group, overrepresented in many negative Demographic social emotional wellbeing Health Indicators

In 2010 Western Australia primary health care providers identified a need for services for high risk Aboriginal children. In July 2012, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children (PMH) obtained funding from the COAG Closing the Gap initiative to improve ambulatory (out of hospital) care for Aboriginal children. Initially funding was to run the program in three sites (Perth metropolitan, Kimberley and Pilbara), however in July 2015 the funding changed to WA Footprints to Better Health and the program was rolled out State wide.

Aims and Objectives of our program

Koorliny Moort aims to Increase Aboriginal families’ engagement with health services and improve out of hospital care for WA Aboriginal Children, particularly those who are hard to reach. We aim to provide hospital care closer to where their families live and work.

The program is staffed by people who are trained and supported to provide high quality, responsive services to Aboriginal children.

It is a 2 stream Model of Care – Care Coordination and Paediatric Outreach Clinics.

Improve Care Coordination

  • Patient Centred Care
  • Develop partnerships with Aboriginal Medical Services and other primary care services
  • Support local health services – primary and secondary
  • Help Coordinate appointments to minimise travel and disruption.
  • Provide health advice and social, cultural and family support.
  • Initiate Telehealth Services
  • Improve hospital discharge planning and communication
  • Improve engagement with local Paediatricians and increase referrals back to local Paediatricians on discharge.

Improve Outreach Paediatric Clinics

  • Increase access to paediatric specialist outreach clinics otherwise seen at PMH.
  • Coordinate appointments closer to home.
  • Provision of Metropolitan Paediatric Outreach Clinics –are set in partnership with service providers Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service and Child and Adolescent Community Health Aboriginal Health Team deliver a holistic coordinate care “closer to home” process.
  • Fortnightly Paediatric clinics for Aboriginal Children at PMH.
  • Help to locate children in towns and communities.
  • Provide feedback of outcomes and follow up.

Inclusion Criteria

West Australian Aboriginal children aged 0-16 years that have any planned follow-up at Princess Margaret Hospital or King Edward Memorial Hospital.

Referrals:

  • Children with complex medical needs
  • Preterm infants
  • Children who have been difficult to reach
  • Children whose families request review closer to homes and country

Since Commencement

We have had 2373 children enrolled into the program from August 2012 to June 2017 – Perth Metro 54.7% (1285) Kimberley 22% (525) the Pilbara 12% (285) the Goldfields 4%(99) The Midwest 3% (106) and the Southern 3%(73)

Our Active Enrolments as at 27/6/2017 stands at 808

Metro (clinic):354, Metro non – clinic 148, Kimberley 133, Pilbara 72, Goldfields 28, Midwest 52 and Southern 21

Yearly evaluations are conducted and measurable outcomes show improvement in clinic attendance rates, reduced emergency department presentations and hospital admissions and reduced length of stay.

Our Goal

is to facilitate the delivery of the right health care service, in the right order, at the right time and in the right setting

Presenters

Debra Rose

Debra Rose

Debra Rose is a Gamilaraay Woman from NW New South Wales town of Walgett and has been a visitor to Noongar Land (Perth WA) for the past 18 years. Debra’s was the Senior Criminal
Justice Officer in South Australia for the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. During 2000 - 2002 worked with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in WA in designing and implementing the WA Health’s Aboriginal Women’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Program.

Debra has worked in the areas of Aboriginal Alternative Dispute Resolution Service with the WA Attorney Generals, Senior Programs Officer with WA Corrective Services facilitating the cultural specific Aboriginal Perpetrators Family Domestic Violence Program and was Deputy Chief Executive Officer for WA Aboriginal Legal Services. Debra is also one of the founding members of the National Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Women’s Legal Services (1990 to current day) with an emphasis on Family and Domestic Violence.
Paul Bell

Paul Bell

Paul Bell – Koorliny Moort, Princess Margaret Hospital.Paul is a nurse who has been working in Aboriginal Health for approximately 4 years. He has worked at Princess Margaret Hospital for the last 13 years. After completing his nurse training he worked at several locations in the UK. eventually moving to Perth WA.
Dr Ciara Peake

Dr Ciara Peake

Dr Ciara Peake. Paediatrician - Koorliny Moort, Princess Margaret Hospital. Ciara is a General Paediatrician with a special interest in Aboriginal Health. She completed her medical training in Western Australia and has been employed by Princess Margaret Hospital for Children for the past 12 years. Throughout her training and career she has spent time developing her skills and interests in several remote and regional areas of Western Australia.
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Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 12.05pm – 12.30pm

CARE -Comprehensive Physiotherapy care to Indigenous People in South East Queensland – Presented by Lowana Williams

Author

Lowana Williams

Physiotherapy care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is required across the lifespan and includes acute muscular injuries, falls prevention and management, women’s health, paediatric therapy and chronic pain management. Those who are unable to afford physiotherapy are required to navigate complex, confusing and limited health services which can act as a barrier to many Indigenous people accessing physiotherapy. However, through the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents of South East Queensland are able to access affordable, convenient and comprehensive physiotherapy care.

The aim of this presentation is to describe the development of a physiotherapy service connected to a comprehensive Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled setting. This service has grown from 1 Physiotherapist to 5.5 FTE Physiotherapists over the past 3 years and has transitioned from a contractor model to employed staff. This has enabled the Physiotherapy service to be embedded within a primary health care setting and connected with the GP’s, nurses, Aboriginal Health workers, receptionists, transport officers as well as other allied health professions. Although the majority of physiotherapy is provided in the clinic setting, therapy is also provided at schools, aged care facilities and client’s homes. Schedules are aligned to enable connections across disciplines which assists staff to learn in an inter-professional model and also improves client outcomes. The work of IUIH physiotherapists extends beyond that of client care and involves connecting clients with other parts of the health and education systems and connecting with other health professionals to develop manual handling training for the organisation and associated clinics. Workforce growth and development will also be described in this presentation.

Presenter

Lowana Williams

Lowana Williams

Lowana is of Yugambeh decent and grew up in Brisbane. She commenced working as a physiotherapist in 2009 after completing a Masters of Physiotherapy at the University of Sydney and a Bachelor of Exercise Science through Griffith University. She has worked in the public, private and community sectors of Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and the United Kingdom. She is currently working in Brisbane at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health where she provides clinical care, supervises students and lectures at the University of Queensland. Through her work she has had the opportunity to attend the National Indigenous Cricket Championships as the physiotherapist for Queensland for the past two years. In addition to her IAHA membership, Lowana is also on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Committee of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. She is currently studying a Masters of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at James Cook University.

CULTURES - Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Academy Partnership – Kylie Stothers & Sharon Wallace

Overview

AMSANT and IAHA have worked in partnership to create this NT lead innovative training model which is about re-shaping and re-designing how training is delivered to Aboriginal high school students.  In order to build a culturally responsive health workforce for the future we need to be introducing potential health career pathways to our young people. The model is centered on ensuring that training and education is delivered in a way that embeds the centrality of culture and leadership, whilst having a holistic approach to health.  The NT Aboriginal Health Academy Project (NTAHAP) model is designed to work collaboratively across health disciplines, and organizational structures (health, education, training, employment) to improve and increase the opportunities for Aboriginal high school students to achieve positive outcomes for their lives and their families, through mentoring, family partnerships and positive peer relationships.  This program is designed to be transferable to other communities to meet their local health and wellbeing needs for sustainable workforce development solutions that lead to building community capacity and ultimately young Aboriginal men and women taking up careers in health.

Presenters

Kylie Stothers

Kylie Stothers

Kylie Stothers is a mother of two children and a Jawoyn woman who was born and raised in Katherine, NT. Kylie comes from a large extended family with strong ties in Katherine and surrounding communities. Kylie is the Workforce Development Officer at Indigenous Allied Health Australia and is a social worker who has worked throughout the Northern Territory for over 18 years. She previously worked for the Centre for Remote Health and Flinders University NT at the Katherine site and her interest areas are in child and maternal health, working with families, health promotion, child protection and health workforce issues. Kylie is passionate about education, health and issues that relate to remote and rural Australia.
Sharon Wallace

Sharon Wallace

As a proud Wangkumarra woman from SW Queensland she has lived and worked in the Northern Territory for over 17 yrs, her first responsibility being to her family as a mother, kinship carer, Aunty and matriarch in the family now that her mum and dad have passed on from Cancer. Sharon is a Senior Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) and has been for 22 yrs, and has also completed her Master of Public Health. She has held positions in the NT in Katherine, Nhulunbuy and now Darwin; and has worked as a Clinician, in Health Promotion, AHP Education and VET Lecturer, and has been working at AMSANT for 7 years first employed as an Indigenous Health Project Officer (IHPO) and now as a Workforce Policy Officer. Sharon’s role is supporting approx. 80 trainee and registered Aboriginal Health Practitioners in the NT Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector and she also represents AHPs on a number of advisory, working and governance groups and boards as an advocate and Primary Health Care professional with a strong focus on research, policy/strategy development and implementation. Her role is not limited to just support for Aboriginal Health Practitioners but all Aboriginal staff employed within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in the NT.
CONNECTION - An Optometry initiative to increase the eye health workforce – David Aanundsen & Lauren Hutchinson

Authors

(1) David Aanundsen (2) Lauren Hutchinson

Organisations:

(1) The Fred Hollows Foundation (The Foundation), Indigenous Australia Program (IAP) and the (2) Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) are collaborating on a workforce initiative to support a student get optometry work experience in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Optometry primary care setting.

What are the aims of the presentation?

This presentation will describe:

  • the experience and lessons learnt working in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary care setting.
  • how the collaborative project contributes to a model of integrated eye care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a primary care setting in South East Queensland

Presentation details

There are currently very few Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people working as Optometrists. This project is about encouraging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Optometry students to consider working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care in a primary care situation. This work placement style initiative aims to provide a more detailed opportunity to gain experience working with a team of eye health professionals in a primary care setting. Regular visits to local clinics around south-east Queensland and skilled supervision hope to provide a positive experience that will bring more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into the eye health workforce. As a trial measure it has been very successful.

The presentation will focus on Lauren Hutchinson’s experience over the last twelve months as well as talk about how the partnership between IUIH and The Foundation aim to increase workforce capacity and encourage more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to work in the eye health sector.

Who are the organisations?

The Foundation works through direct partnerships with local service providers and focusses on the development and implementation of sustainable solutions in the current eye health system for people living in underserviced, rural and remote communities.

IUIH operates on a regional hub and spoke model that leads the planning, development and coordination of health service delivery to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in SEQ. The IUIH was established in 2009 by the four Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in SEQ to provide for the needs of Australia’s second largest Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Since its inception the regional network has expanded to include 18 multidisciplinary primary health clinics, with more clinics planned in the future.

Presenters

David Aanundsen

David Aanundsen

David Aanundsen is a Development Effectiveness Program Officer in the Indigenous Australia Program of The Fred Hollows Foundation. David is a Yamatji man from Perth and currently residing in Darwin. He has worked in various roles in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health for the past 18 years.
Lauren Hutchinson

Lauren Hutchinson

Lauren Hutchinson is a Wiradjuri woman, born and raised in the small town of Molong NSW. She is currently living in Brisbane undertaking a Bachelor of Vision Science/Masters of Optometry Degrees of which she is about to graduate from.
YARNING - Integrating care, connection and culture to Aboriginal health and well-being – Tracey Brand

Authors

Tracey Brand

Overview

The Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) is an Aboriginal community controlled health services in Alice Springs.  It is one of the largest Aboriginal community controlled health services in the country.  Congress has developed a comprehensive model of primary health care delivering quality, evidence-based services, based on the foundation of cultural safe, accessible, responsive and client focused.

Congress delivers whole of life care, from maternal to end of life and everything in between. Congress employs a multidisciplinary team of over 400 staff and invest heavily in support services to compliment and strengthen its care services including an internal cross-cultural induction program, developed and delivered by Aboriginal staff, a cultural adviser, a team of Aboriginal interpreters and an Aboriginal Staff Advisory Committee that provides advice to the Chief Executive Officer to ensure services remain culturally safe and strong.  Staff are guided by a set of local cultural protocols that guide staff in service delivery.

The presentation will focus on Congress’ comprehensive primary health care model and the integral role of allied health services in delivering integrated clinical based and outreach services to Aboriginal clients in Alice Springs and remote Aboriginal communities in Central Australia. The presentation will share Congress’ model that encapsulate an integrated life span approach to care, culture and connection to improve health and well-being outcome for Aboriginal people.

Presenter

Tracey Brand

Tracey Brand

Tracey Brand is an Eastern Arrernte woman born and raised in Alice Springs. She is the General Manager of Health Services at the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress.

Tracey has over twenty years of experience in leading Aboriginal service delivery across Aboriginal community controlled organisations and the Northern Territory Government.  She holds a Master of Business Leadership, Master of Business Administration and a Masters of Arts in Aboriginal Administration.

Tracey represents Congress on Aboriginal issues on Territory and national committees and is an active Director on two local Aboriginal community controlled boards.

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DAY TWO

Wednesday 29 November 2017 - 11.05am - 11.30am

CARE - Opening the Conversation about access to health care for Aboriginal People – Amanda Bailey & Nadia Di Girolamo

Authors

Amanda M Bailey, Nadia M Di Girolamo
Occupational Therapy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia

Background

This project, entitled ‘Opening the Conversation’, was conducted by two 4th year Occupational Therapy students from the University of South Australia working in conjunction with Reconciliation SA. The project ran for 9 weeks, between February and April 2017 following a period of scoping in August 2016 and pre-project relationship building from November 2016.

Aim

The aim of the project was “to open a conversation about the cultural biases and assumptions of mainstream healthcare systems and how they can create barriers to appropriate access to health services for Aboriginal people.”

Approach

The project was undertaken in response to the identified barriers to appropriate healthcare access for the Aboriginal Community, and the significant gaps in health outcomes between the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal population. The project worked with two communities in Adelaide, the Aboriginal Community as health consumers, and a community of healthcare professionals. Responding to the complexities of this issue, the project was conducted as a 9 week needs analysis, as decided in consultation with the steering committee. The underpinnings of the project were social justice, equity and community empowerment. The Aboriginal Community was consulted throughout the project. The information gathering process was centred on yarning, shared knowledge and understanding.

Key results

The project identified two key elements of access (appropriateness and acceptability) that were explored in further detail during the needs analysis. The project experienced great traction, illustrated by the interest shown by key stakeholders and the willingness of the Community to engage in the yarning process. Several conversations were opened at an executive level, with senior Aboriginal Health Professionals within the Adelaide Local Health Networks, expressing interest in the project findings. Opening the Conversation identified several gaps in service provisions, such as the lack of Aboriginal specific services in Southern Adelaide and a lack of youth and allied health services in Adelaide. Further key finding in the project included the role structure of Aboriginal Liaison Officers (ALO) within mainstream health and how this affected health outcomes for both the ALO and client.

Conclusion

The project sought to name and open conversations about the barriers systemic racism poses for the Aboriginal Community and was successful in this endeavour. Input from the Aboriginal Community and from professionals within Adelaide health services allowed great depth and breadth to be covered by the project in a short time. The interest shown from the various stakeholders validated that systemic racism is an important issue. The interest the project generated at an executive level in the health sector aided in strengthening relationships between the agency, and stakeholders in a position to influence systemic change. The findings of this project are being used by Reconciliation SA to advocate for change in health systems that pose barriers for the Aboriginal Community in Adelaide.

The presentation will discuss the aims, methods, project findings as well as how the project has been sustained and developed over a six-month timeframe by Reconciliation SA.

Presenters

Amanda Bailey

Amanda Bailey

Amanda Bailey is a Ngarrindjeri woman, a wife and a mother of four children.

I am a 37 year old, 4th year Occupational Therapy student living in Adelaide. I have always wanted to work in a field that helps people, I began as an enrolled nurse, before studying occupational therapy. After my study is completed, I hope to work in the field of palliative care as an occupational therapist. Occupational therapists can enable clients to achieve an end of life experience that is meaningful to them individually, both culturally and personally, and this is something I would like to help be a part of.
Nadia M Di Girolamo

Nadia M Di Girolamo

Nadia M Di Girolamo is a 29 year old Occupational Therapy student with an interest in community health and development, paediatrics and Aboriginal health.

I have a degree in Graphic Design, however after completing my studies I realised I wasn't fulfilled by that job role and wanted to help people. I stumbled upon occupational therapy in the university course guide, got accepted into the degree and have never looked back. Occupational therapy resonates with me as it has such a diverse application and unique approach to helping and understanding people. It allows patients to be the pilots in their own health journey, which I believe in especially important for achieving meaningful health and wellbeing outcomes.
CULTURES - Exploring new ways that introduce families to Allied Health Services – Jadnah Davies & Sue Thomas

Overview

This presentation will showcase an innovative way to introduce families to the benefits of allied health. A therapeutic camp that gives children opportunities to have targeted intensive therapies while building parents and carers knowledge of therapeutic interventions. The camp is one part of the process of providing services to remote communities using new ways of working including new technologies.

Presenters

Jadnah Davies

Jadnah Davies

Jadnah Davies is a 27 year old mother of 3 and has lived in Fitzroy Crossing since she was 3, she is connected to the Fitzroy Valley through her maternal grandmother, a Gooniyandi women who was removed from the Fitzroy Valley in 1934. Jadnah completed her secondary education in Fitzroy Crossing via Distance Education and has worked for Marninwarntikura Women’s Resource Centre since 2012 in various roles. She started working on the final stage of the Lililwan Project, the FASD prevalence study, as a community navigator feeding back research findings to communities. The Marulu Strategy, designed to Make FASD History shapes the work of the Marulu Unit. The major focus of this work is to support children and families impacted by FASD and Early Life Trauma. Jadnah is very passionate and committed to progressing the work of the Marulu Strategy, knowing the ongoing benefits it has to her community’s future.
Sue Thomas

Sue Thomas

Sue Thomas has worked and lived in the Kimberley as a teacher, principal, researcher and education consultant. She has worked on a number of national Indigenous education projects and is building a professional learning community raising awareness and connecting people working to address the needs of children and young people living with FASD. Sue is currently the Marulu FASD and ELT Strategy Coordinator working with key stakeholders to make FASD history.
CONNECTION - Connecting Fathers – What we’ve learned from Strong Fathers Program – Sharon Gough & Jon Blurton

Authors

Michelle Blogna1, Sharon Gough2, Jon Blurton3

  1. LIFT Program, Indigo Junction, MIDLAND, WA, Australia
  2. Indigo Junction, MIDLAND, Western Australia, Australia
  3. Strong Fathers’ Program, Indigo Junction, MIDLAND, Western Australia, Australia

Overview

A twenty-minute presentation by Sharon Gough, Michelle Blogna and Jon Blurton will outline the success of The Strong Fathers’ Program. It has been going through the process with its funding body to become evidence based itself. However, there is an evidence base which confirms that supporting fathers and connecting them to supports, Community and Culture promotes positive outcomes and with longitudinal research, this will in turn show vast improvements in generations to come.

The presentation shows the evidence base surrounding the Strong Fathers’ Project, some history of fathering and how colonisation had a devastating effect on fathering and fathering roles in Aboriginal and Indigenous households. The presentation will then focus on the strength-based, solution-focused model of connecting fathers and what the mounting evidence base says about the role of Aboriginal and Indigenous fathering roles and the importance of father-inclusive practice to bring about real change. For example:

Traditional Aboriginal fathering roles were reported as being “intimate, caring and involved” (Hammond, Lester, Fletcher and Pascoe, 2004, p. 5). It is since colonization that the role of the father has become undermined and devalued in the Aboriginal family setting (Collard, Adams, Palmer & McMullan, 2016). Furthermore, there is an urgent need for support and resources to be directed to programs that will overcome the barriers to positive outcomes for Aboriginal fathers (Hammond, et al., 2004; Hammond, 2010).

Indigo Junction saw a vital need for father-inclusive practices which is echoed by a range of other authors (Berlyn, Wise & Soriano, 2008; Fleming & King, 2010; Cameron, Coady, & Hoy, 2014; Fletcher, May, St George, Stoker & Oshan, 2014; and Stuart, May and Hammond, 2015). Furthermore, it is of particular importance to engage Aboriginal/Indigenous fathers and fathers of Aboriginal/Indigenous children.

The role of the father in Aboriginal households was in need of supports. Women were engaging in supports, however, fathers were being overlooked in service provision. Indigo Junction saw the need for the family to progress at the same pace. Applying Bronfenbrenner’s (1977) Ecological Systems Theory, Indigo Junction identified that fathers living within emergency and transitional housing lacked interconnectedness across ecological systems.  Intervening in a way that built connections to family, peers, services, neighbours, community, policies and culture was critical as it is through these connections that Bronfenbrenner believes humans develop the environmental supports and coping skills required to embark on a process of transition and development.

Clare and Oakley (2017) and Collard and colleagues (2016) report that the aftermath of colonisation and subsequent forced removal of children negatively impacted Aboriginal families. Yeo (2003) also confirms colonisation is still impacting on Aboriginal families. There remains a deficit in parenting skills as well as experiences of unresolved grief, trauma, depression and mental illness which is linked to substance abuse issues (Clare & Oakley, 2017).

Indigo Junction are proud of its success and have had the privilege of having on board Professor Mike Clare who has been helpful in putting forward submissions for the program to be Evidence Based in itself.

Presenters

Sharon Gough

Sharon Gough

Coming from a background in the Education Department, Sharon moved into the role of Program Manager at Indigo Junction (formerly Swan Emergency Accommodation) around five years ago. Since she has arrived, Sharon has been a trail blazer in implementing Trauma Informed Care and Practice into Indigo Junction, including bringing all policies and procedures into line to ensure that every level of Indigo Junction is trauma informed.
At the time of writing this bio’, Sharon is overseas as one of the 106 Australians chosen in 2016 for a Churchill Fellowship. She has travelled to New Zealand and Canada in search of new ideas, innovation and excellence with regards to transitioning from care arrangements and better ways to support Indigenous Communities. Sharon is an experienced, energetic and impassioned public speaker.
Jon Blurton

Jon Blurton


From his first job at 13 years old selling newspapers on St George’s Terrace, Perth for $20 per week, Jon comes to Indigo Junction with a wealth of knowledge and experience. Jon has worked in administration, mining and Community Development and Employment Programs.
Jon is a Noongar man from the Balladong mob and has been an asset to Indigo Junction. When he moved into the role of the Strong Fathers’ Program worker, he brought with him lived experience and the wealth of knowledge from a vast and varied career. Jon is a single father to three beautiful girls who are his life and love.
We are proud to have Jon at Indigo Junction and see the program grow and flourish since Jon has been at the helm. Jon is happy to be co-presenting the Connecting Fathers – What we’ve learned from the Strong Fathers’ Program with Sharon Gough.
COLLABORATION - Jiji – Community-initiated interprofessional, student lead program in remote communities – Cheryl Davis & Lorna Rosenwax

Authors

Victoria Bishop1, Ann Carruthers1, Cheryl Davis1, Christine Drury1, Carolyn Jones1, Julie Morriss1, Caitlin Prince1, Lorna Rosenwax1, Cori Williams1, Coral Wrona2

  1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  2. Western Desert Lands Aboriginal Corporation, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Aim

To provide access to quality, sustainable health services to children and families living in the remote communities of Jigalong and Punmu while offering unique training opportunities to Curtin Health Sciences students.

Content

Martu leaders and Curtin University embarked on a partnership to improve outcomes for Martu children. The Jiji (‘little children’) Program began in the remote communities of Jigalong and Punmu in May 2016 and continues in 2017. Jiji is based on the successful model operating at Challis Community School where student-led service delivery has resulted in significant child health, academic and social improvements. Jiji is guided by the principles of community based rehabilitation and family-centred practice, and was initially funded for two years. It aims to:

  • Improve Aboriginal children’s health and education access.
  • Build the capacity of parents and teachers.
  • Engage the communities in healthcare, by working with families and their children together.
  • Improve recruitment of health professionals to remote areas.

To achieve these aims, Jigalong and Punmu each host a team consisting of a speech pathology and occupational therapy supervisor, and final year Curtin University speech pathology and occupational therapy students. Each team lives in community for a five-week placement, with three blocks occurring between May and October of each year. Students are provided with a week-long Indigenous curriculum content pre-placement and a week-long post-placement debrief placement. The pre-placement content includes ‘Working in Remote Aboriginal Communities’ (e.g. history, past government policies, people) and understanding Aboriginal Ways of Working. Using the NATSI Health Curriculum Framework for ‘Entry to Practice’ students, students are expected to:

  • Design strategies to incorporate knowledge of Aboriginal culture and concepts of health and wellbeing into health care practice to enhance cultural safety.
  • Establish strategies to work in partnership with Aboriginal health professionals, organisations and communities, and devise a plan to respectfully acquire cultural information.
  • Develop strategies for mitigating the potential challenges of different cultural values and behaviours between Aboriginal clients and mainstream health care practices.
  • Devise strategies for diagnosing and treating Aboriginal clients from the perspective of the social determinants of health.
  • Development of interprofessional practice capabilities is also required.

Evidence from an independent evaluation indicates the high level of success and acceptance of Jiji at multiple levels: Martu families and children; school staff; and diverse external agencies. It also indicates the increased cultural sensitivities, skill acquisition and interprofessional prowess gained by the students.

This presentation reports on Jiji in terms of respect, understanding, learning and transformation. It presents some practicalities of setting up and maintaining the program. Jiji demonstrates that the provision of an interprofessional, student lead, community-based rehabilitation service is able to meet the needs of multiple stakeholders. Importantly, it provides evidence for rethinking the delivery of services in regional and remote Australia.

Presenters

Professor Lorna Rosenwax

Professor Lorna Rosenwax

Lorna is the Deputy Pro Vice-Chancellor, Health Sciences at Curtin University. She is an occupational therapist and population health researcher. Lorna grew up in regional Western Australia and has a strong affinity with the land. She is one of the primary instigators of Jiji - a Martu - Curtin initiative, having worked closely with community members from the remote Martu communities of Punmu and Jigalong, Western Desert Lands Aboriginal Corporation, and other key stakeholders to bring Jiji to fruition.
Cheryl Davis

Cheryl Davis

I am a Noongar woman, of the Yuet and Balladong clans of the Noongar Nation. I was born in Perth, Western Australia. I completed year 10 high school but didn’t have any career aspirations. So, I commenced my career as a receptionist/secretary working in various legal services. About 10 years later, with limited career opportunities, I completed an enabling program and commenced law and arts - but neither subjects inspired me. In 1999, I applied for an administration job at the Centre for Aboriginal Studies, Curtin University. Here I became inspired, especially around education, given that most staff were Indigenous, had university qualifications, and were teaching Indigenous studies to Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. A few months later, I enrolled into a health sciences degree at University of Sydney. I really enjoyed my studies and subsequently won the Charles Perkins Scholarship Award for an Indigenous student attaining the highest aggregate marks over the course of my degree. During my studies, I commenced teaching in the Indigenous Community Health program. I really enjoyed the teaching experiences and loved watching Indigenous students grow in confidence, complete their qualifications and graduate with a new sense of pride. Some 18 years later, I have a strategic leadership role within the Faculty of Health Sciences. I still love the university environment especially for Indigenous students, who today, have the opportunity of studying medicine, physiotherapy, psychology and pharmacy. Building an Indigenous health workforce is significant if we are going to ‘Close the Gap’ in Indigenous life expectancy and disadvantage.
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Wednesday 29 November 2017 - 11.35am - 12 NOON

CARE - ‘Culture is inclusion’: A community-driven approach for the social inclusion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability – Scott Avery

Author

Scott Avery, Policy and Research Director, First Peoples Disability Network (Australia)
PhD Candidate, University of Technology Sydney

Overview

This presentation will outline the results of a community-based research project conducted by First Peoples Disability Network (FPDN) which contributes to a better understanding of the nature and prevalence of disability amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience disability at more than twice the rate of other Australians and experience inequality across a spectrum of health, wellbeing and social indicators (ABS, 2017), however the research and evidence base which informs practice and policy is thin.

FPDN adopts a ‘numbers and the narratives’ approach to its research, which brings together statistical datasets with oral testimony from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability. This unique approach highlights the breadth of issues that affect people with disability as well as its human impact. The data demonstrates the overwhelmingly adverse intersectional impact of being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and having disability across a range of wellbeing and social indicators including health, educational attainment, employment participation, personal safety and exposure to the criminal justice system.

The one startling exception to the inequalities that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability experience is participation in cultural activities. When Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with disability participate in Indigenous cultural activities, such as ceremony and use of native languages, they participate at the same rate as other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It is only when the protective force of their culture and community is absent, and they interact with the western systems in health, education and justice, that inequality and disadvantage materialises.

This research highlights an Indigenous worldview of humanity where the cultural norm is inclusion and where ‘dis’ in ‘disability’ is largely absent. This core finding shows culture is the foundation upon which the unique health and social inequities experienced by Indigenous peoples with disability can be addressed. It also provides an opportunity for practitioners and policy-makers to critically reflect on the true meaning of culturally competence in understanding the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability.

Presenter

Scott Avery

Scott Avery

Scott Avery is descendant from the Worimi people and is the Policy and Research Director at the First Peoples Disability Network (Australia), a non-Government Organisation constituted by and for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples with disability. He has an extensive career in research and public policy in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs, disability, health justice and education. He is undertaking a doctorate in Aboriginal disability at University of Technology, Sydney (Australia) and is the lead Investigator on ‘Living our ways’, a community-directed research program which has been awarded funding support through the National Disability Research and Development Scheme. He has been appointed to numerous expert advisory groups for the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and other government agencies and is a recipient of a research support scholarship through the Lowitja Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research.

CULTURES - Missing Voices: Aboriginal peoples’ stories informing brain injury rehabilitation services – Elizabeth Armstrong & Catelyn Dowell

Authors

Elizabeth Armstrong1, Natalie Ciccone1, Deborah Hersh1, Meaghan McAllister1, Catelyn Dowell1, Juli Coffin2, Sandra Thompson3, Judy Katzenellenbogen4, 5, Leon Flicker4, Colleen Hayward1, Deborah Woods6

  1. Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  2. University of Notre Dame, Broome, Western Australia, Australia
  3. Western Australian Centre for Rural Health, University of Western Australia, Geraldton, Western Australia, Australia
  4. University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  5. Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  6. Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service, Geraldton, Western Australia, Australia

Background

Stroke and traumatic brain injury are significant and likely under-identified health issues in Aboriginal communities.  They are both known to occur up to three times more frequently in Aboriginal Australians than non-Aboriginal Australians. To date, little is known of Aboriginal people’s experiences of these conditions or specifically of their experience of resultant acquired communication disorders (ACD) – the area of focus in this paper. Aboriginal people are under-represented in brain injury rehabilitation services and these services are traditionally staffed by Allied Health Professionals.

Aims

The Missing Voices project (NHMRC#1046228, funded 2013-2016) aimed to document the extent and impact of ACD in Aboriginal people and families within Western Australia.  This was the first step in a journey towards Aboriginal peoples’ perspectives informing brain injury rehabilitation services.

Methods

Thirty two Aboriginal people with an experience of acquired communication disorder (aphasia, dysarthria or cognitive-communication disorder) after a stroke or traumatic brain injury and 17 family members were referred to the Missing Voices project. Participants came from urban, rural and remote communities across Western Australia and shared their stories during semi-structured interviews undertaken by the eight Aboriginal interviewers employed during the course of the project.

Topics explored during the ‘research yarn’ included participants’ hospital experiences and follow up, living with ACD, assistance required immediately after and since the brain injury and suggestions for improving access to assistance and rehabilitation services.  The videotaped interviews were transcribed and analysed utilising thematic analysis. Member checking occurred where possible.

Results

Initial themes from the interviews related to dislocation from family and country affecting ongoing rehabilitation options, a need for more flexible outpatient rehabilitation services and more information on community services available, systemic problems with communication in hospitals, need for practical information to manage long-term issues, inevitability of stroke, and individual stories of moving forward.  The presentation will explore the findings to date and include reflections from one local Aboriginal interviewer.

Discussion

Results show a mixed range of experiences. Many stories showed that the communication disorder was often embedded in broader health issues rather than being a primary focus of discussion. The findings indicate a need for the development of more culturally accessible rehabilitation services. To address this, a National Health & Medical Research Council partnership grant was successfully sought with partners including metropolitan and regional hospitals in Western Australia, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, local neurological nursing care providers and the Stroke Foundation.  The Partnership Project entitled ‘Enhancing rehabilitation after brain injury in Aboriginal Australians’ (#1132468) will trial a model for culturally accessible rehabilitation services and the model for this will be presented.

Presenters

Professor Elizabeth Armstrong

Professor Elizabeth Armstrong

Professor Elizabeth Armstrong is Foundation Chair in Speech Pathology at Edith Cowan University in Perth. She has published widely in the area of aphasia after stroke and presents regularly at both national and international speech pathology, linguistics, allied health and medical conferences. Beth leads a strong multidisciplinary team of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers exploring the experiences of Aboriginal brain injury survivors and their families. The team has been funded by organisations including the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, the NH&MRC, the Western Australian Department of Health and the Stroke Foundation to support this work which is focused on improving service delivery and quality of life for Aboriginal brain injury survivors. Beth is also currently building an international team from Canada, New Zealand, Australia and South Africa which is the first to examine commonalities in Indigenous experiences of brain injury and related services internationally.
Catelyn Dowell

Catelyn Dowell

Catelyn Dowell is a Gija woman from Warmun Community (Turkey Creek) in the East Kimberley of Western Australia. Born in Darwin and raised on country, Catelyn reflects on the freedom she had growing up in Warmun and says the best thing about it was knowing that she was part of something, growing up with highly respected old people, the pillars of the community; Elders who had so much culture and knowledge. Catelyn was guided through her childhood by the ‘amazing old people’ that were her grandparents and also by her Mother who deliberately chose to raise her children in community so they could grow up around their mob. Catelyn attended boarding school in Perth before taking up positions at home in the Kimberley. Catelyn lives and works in Broome and joined the Missing Voices project in 2014.
CONNECTION - Implementing the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework – Leanne Pilkington, Lauren Kinsella & Meaghan McCambridge

Authors

Lauren Kinsella, Meaghan McCambridge, Jennifer Chynoweth, Helen Zorbas, Louise De Busch,  Leanne Pilkington
Cancer Australia, Surry Hills, NSW, Australia

Aim

To drive a national, shared, strategic approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer control in Australia, informed by the Framework.

Background

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 30% more likely to die from cancer than non-Indigenous Australians.

Cancer Australia developed the first nationally agreed strategic framework to guide future directions in cancer control for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Development was underpinned by a collaborative, evidence-based and consultative approach which resulted in seven agreed priorities:

  1. Improving knowledge, attitudes and understanding
  2. Focusing prevention activities
  3. Increasing access to and participation in cancer screening
  4. Ensuring early diagnosis
  5. Ensuring optimal and culturally appropriate care
  6. Ensuring families and carers are supported
  7. Strengthening services and systems to deliver good quality, integrated services

There was consensus at a national forum of key stakeholders that implementation of these priorities is a shared opportunity and a shared responsibility.

Method

  1. Cancer Australia established a Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control to help drive the national implementation and encourage cross-sector collaboration in addressing the seven priorities.
  2. Cancer Australia is facilitating the adoption and implementation of the Cancer Framework in order to enhance national, jurisdictional, regional and local efforts to improve Indigenous cancer outcomes.
  3. Cancer Australia is currently addressing Priorities 1, 3, 5 and 7.

Results

  1. The Leadership Group continues to guide implementation
  2. The Cancer Framework has enhanced cancer plans, policies and frameworks
  3. Cancer Australia is undertaking a range of initiatives which directly address several priorities:
  • developing a monitoring and reporting framework to report on progress towards implementation and inform future national cancer control initiatives for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • building the capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and Health Workers on cancer awareness, prevention and early detection
  • identifying critical success factors for Indigenous women participating in mammographic screening
  • developing an Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer
  • providing grants to support people with cancer
  • strengthening national cancer data capacity through the development of data on cancer stage, treatments and recurrence; and the regular reporting of key cancer control indicators

Conclusion

Cancer Australia’s engagement and strong collaborative approach to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities was integral to the development of a shared agenda to improve Indigenous cancer outcomes in Australia.

Cancer Australia, working closely with the Leadership Group, is driving national implementation of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework to improve cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Presenters

Leanne Pilkington

Leanne Pilkington

Leanne is a Nyoongar yorga from Binjarep country in WA. She was the Aboriginal Program Officer at BreastScreen WA for 11 years and is currently on secondment to WA Country Health Service as Program Manager Statewide Aboriginal Liaison. She is passionate about Aboriginal health, especially women’s health and cancer issues. Leanne has presented at various State, National and international conferences and delivered cross-cultural awareness training to various agencies.
Lauren Kinsella

Lauren Kinsella

Lauren Kinsella is a Senior Project Officer in the Indigenous and Rural team at Cancer Australia. In this role, Lauren has been involved in the development and implementation of many projects aimed at improving cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This has included managing the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework project and developing resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners. Prior to joining Cancer Australia in 2012, Lauren worked in curriculum development at Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education in Darwin.
Meaghan McCambridge

Meaghan McCambridge

Meaghan McCambridge is a Project Officer in the Indigenous and Rural team at Cancer Australia. Most recently, Meaghan has played a key role in developing the Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer, which will guide the delivery of consistent, culturally appropriate, high quality and evidence based care. Meaghan is also the secretariat of Cancer Australia’s Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control.
COLLABORATION - The Quinine Project: Building a locally responsive allied health workforce – Lesa Towers & Michelle Lincoln

Authors

Lesa Towers1, Michelle Lincoln2, Kim Bulkeley2, Angela Firth3, Richard Cheney3, Phil Naden4, Kylie Gwynne5

  1. Aboriginal Workforce Unit, Western NSW Local Health District, Dubbo, NSW, Australia
  2. Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  3. Western NSW Local Health District, Dubbo, NSW, Australia
  4. Bila Muuji Aboriginal Health Services, Dubbo, NSW, Australia
  5. Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Overview

The delivery of culturally responsive allied health services for Aboriginal people in small rural and remote communities in NSW is challenging. The workforce issues, geographical distance and historical absence of services has resulted in a lack of access to allied health services that meet the community needs. Access to allied health services is a key factor in improving health outcomes for rural populations which have been noted as poorer than their metropolitan counterparts.

The Allied Health Assistant (AHA) workforce has been emerging as a crucial way to spread the reach of limited Allied Health Professional (AHP) resources across Australia. Training and employing local Aboriginal people as AHA’s in remote NSW communities with a high proportion of Aboriginal people is one potential solution to increasing access to a more sustainable allied health service. In rural and remote NSW, Aboriginal AHAs have the potential to deliver culturally appropriate services, understand community contexts and to connect to the community. However, recruiting to these positions, providing adequate training, supervision and meaningful support from AHPs as well as the complexities of working within your own community are potential challenges.

The Quinine Project has been established in partnership with Western NSW local health district, the NSW Ministry of Health, the Poche Centre for Indigenous health and the Faculty of Health sciences at the University of Sydney. This project employed five Aboriginal AHAs into newly created positions, providing services in remote north-west NSW communities for a two year period. The Quinine Project has been operating since November 2016 and we will outline the processes of establishing, on-boarding, supporting and embedding these positions in local services. The training, supervision and support structures for the Aboriginal AHAs will be described and learnings to date shared. This presentation will provide practical information to others considering establishing Aboriginal AHA positions. The issues identified and successful processes will be highlighted from the different perspectives of the project partners, providing a comprehensive overview of the project establishment and progress.

Presenters

Lesa Towers

Lesa Towers

Lesa is a proud Awabakal woman from the Newcastle area and moved to Western NSW 12 years ago. Lesa started her Health career as a Trainee Aboriginal Health Worker and is now an AHPRA Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner that has progressed into leadership and management roles. Lesa currently manages a number of Aboriginal workforce development strategies for the district including the implementation of the School Based Aboriginal Trainee Program, the Trainee Aboriginal Health Worker Program and is currently co leading the implementation of the clinical support systems to employ Aboriginal Health Practitioner roles within the Western NSW Local Health District.
Professor Michelle Lincoln

Professor Michelle Lincoln

Professor Michelle Lincoln is the Deputy Dean in the Faculty of Health Sciences. In this senior role, she is engaged in all aspects of the leadership of the Faculty. Michelle is focused on promoting the role and impact of allied health professionals on the lives of clients and patients and service delivery. Her second focus is on the preparation of the future allied health workforce. This is reflected in both her leadership of the Faculty and her research.
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Wednesday 29 November 2017 - 12.05pm - 12:30pm

CARE - The journey into Occupational Therapy educators delivering culturally safe curriculum – Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie & Meaghan Rice

Authors

Meaghan Rice & Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie The University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA

Overview

This presentation discusses the processes and key findings of an occupational therapy participatory community development project which sought to facilitate conversations around systemic racism and the need for cultural safety within the education of the occupational therapy workforce. In order to satisfy core occupational therapy values such as client-centredness, holism and strength-focussed care, it is essential that cultural safety is upheld by occupational therapists in order to work effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Occupational therapy programs around Australia are required by recent accreditation standards to equip the future workforce with the skills to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally safe manner. Many occupational therapy programs are subsequently working to strengthen this area of curriculum to address the current gap in cultural competency among graduate occupational therapists. Between June and August 2017, a participatory community project was conducted by the University of South Australia in partnership with Reconciliation South Australia. This project sought to build the capacity of occupational therapy educators to deliver cultural safety content within curriculum in order to improve the cultural capabilities of occupational therapy graduates. Through the use of cultural knowledges and community participation, this project developed a comprehensive understanding of the needs of educators and students to deliver and engage with content that seeks to develop cultural safety. Collaboration with a steering committee and working group encouraged input from key stakeholders and community members. The use of meaningful occupations, such as basket weaving and yarning activities facilitated the engagement of the university community in reflexive discussions about cultural safety. The findings of this project have the potential to contribute to the advancement of cultural safety education within occupational therapy, thus improving the care provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The project identifies the needs of the staff and student community, in addition to highlighting and summarising existing and required resources for occupational therapy educators, and the broader university. Furthermore, the findings present the potential for similar projects to be conducted within other universities and for collaboration within the allied health community for a multi-disciplinary approach to building the capacity of the future workforce to deliver culturally safe care.

Presenters

Meaghan Rice

Meaghan Rice

Meaghan Rice is final-year Masters of Occupational Therapy student at the University of South Australia and holds a Bachelor of Health Sciences from the University of Adelaide. Meaghan is interested in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing, particularly the role that community development can play in working towards equitable health care. Meaghan recently completed a ten-week community development placement at Reconciliation SA seeking to improve cultural safety within occupational therapy practice.
Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie

Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie

Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie is a Kaurna man and an Occupational Therapist. He has previously worked in Corrections, Housing and Education. He is currently working at the University of South Australia as a Lecturer in Allied Health Aboriginal Health. He is also working as a Paediatric OT with Country Health SA providing services to remote communities on the far West South Australian Coast.
CULTURES - An interprofessional approach to care of adults with chronic conditions – Maddison Adams & Ashley Potgieter

Authors

Maddison Adams, Ashley Potgieter

Overview

Comprehensive care of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult population requires input from numerous health professionals. Traditionally, these services were accessed through contract arrangements with private providers and/or through the mainstream public health system. This tended to fragment care, no matter how great the individual health service provider was. In South-East Queensland, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community controlled health clinics have opted to regionalise allied health services through the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH). This has enabled provision of interprofessional services in a team to meet the complex care needs of adult clients with a chronic condition. In addition to the client’s primary care GP and health worker, clients also have access to Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists, Podiatrists, Dietitians and a care coordinator, who are working collectively to support each clients’ goals and to holistically address their health needs.

The aim of this presentation is to describe how interprofessional practice is delivered in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled setting to promote optimal outcomes for clients. Tools for case coordination will be discussed, including shared case conferences, joint sessions and joint home visits to address clients’ needs. An interprofessional approach to exercise prescription and monitoring, oedema management and falls prevention will also be outlined, including how outcomes are achieved and monitored. Case studies will be used to demonstrate how working inter-professionally, allied health professionals are able to screen for other professions, allowing for more comprehensive care and ensure clients do not slip through the cracks in service delivery. Having an outcome-driven approach to care also assists with integrating the team into the broader primary health care plan and connecting clients with a one-stop shop.

Presenters

Maddison Adams

Maddison Adams

Maddison Adams is a proud Wulli Wulli woman from Brisbane. She completed her Bachelor of Health Science (Podiatry) at Queensland University of Technology in 2015. Maddison started working at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) after competing some of her clinical placement at IUIH in her final year. Maddison thoroughly enjoys working with community and within a multidisciplinary team. Maddison has shown commitment to Indigenous Health through engagement with Indigenous Allied Health Australia and events within her community. Maddison is committed to working collaboratively with community and other health care professionals to provide holistic and culturally responsive care.
Ashley Potgieter

Ashley Potgieter

Ashley Potgieter is an Occupational Therapist currently working at The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health. She graduated from the University of Queensland in 2013 as an Occupational Therapist (B.Occ Thy). After working in regional Queensland for a few years, Ashley started working with the Institute in 2017 and is committed to helping community to improve health outcomes. She values working in a multidisciplinary team with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and their families, as well as working with adults. Ashley is currently studying her Masters of Advanced Occupational Therapy as she is committed to learning and professional development to be able to deliver a high-quality service when working with her clients.
CONNECTION - ‘Yamanha – li Balit – Djak: We two go together, Stronger’. Navigating through the Health Independence Program (HIP) with an Aboriginal Lens Model of Care – Charmaine Bell & Kerrie Brown

Authors

Charmaine E.A Bell &  Kerrie L Browna
Allied Health, Albury Wodonga Health, Albury Wodonga, NSW, Vic, Australia

Aim

Through an Aboriginal lens you can improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people by providing a culturally safe, collaborative and interdisciplinary sustainable model of care with in the Health Independence Program – HIP.

Content

This presentation will give a brief historical background of the ‘Client Journey’ program within the HUME Region.

Following this, an overview on how the evaluation of the ‘Client Journey’ informed Albury Wodonga Health - AWH in moving forward to support

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people with referral pathways to the HIP and work towards a culturally safe setting.

Learning Objectives

  • To be able to discuss the significance of having an Aboriginal lens model of care within the HIP.
  • To be able to explore the systematic changes needed to support a culturally safe setting.
  • To be able to identify the indicators of why Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people decline and/or disengage services within the HIP.
  • To be able to develop a model of care specific to meeting the needs of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people within the HIP.

Presenters

Charmaine Bell

Charmaine Bell

Charmaine Bell is a proud Woddi Woddi Salt-water Woman from the South Coast of NSW. Charmaine’s country stretches along La Perouse to Wreck Bay. Family, kinship, culture and identity has always kept Charmaine grounded. Today, Charmaine stands proud and tall as she expresses her gratitude to her greatest heroes: her dearest elders both past and present and in particular her Nan. Charmaine believes that her elders have paved a path for her to continue to keep Aboriginal culture alive and strong.
To date, Charmaine is a qualified Aboriginal Health Practitioner and is near completion of her Bachelor Health Science: Mental Health. She has just applied to study the Masters of Social Work at Charles Sturt University. For the past 4 ½ years, Charmaine has worked as an Aboriginal Health Transition Officer in the Client Journey Program at Albury Wodonga Health. Charmaine is passionate about Aboriginal Health being everyone’s business and improving the health outcomes for her community and is a strong advocate for her mob.
Kerrie Brown

Kerrie Brown

Kerrie Brown is a proud Gunditjmara woman now living in Wodonga, Victoria. She has worked in Aboriginal Health for the past 15 years, starting as an Aboriginal Maternity Liaison Officer and moving into service development in the last two years. Kerrie’s core business is developing, leading and supporting service development that meets the Improving Care for Aboriginal Patients program within the hospital setting and assisting with staff cultural training.
COLLABORATION - Bush Medicine Program in the Kimberley Region - Joanna Martin & Louise McKenna

Overview

Balgo (Wirrimanu) is one of Australian’s most remote Aboriginal communities located in the south-east Kimberley region of Western Australia on the northern edge of the Great Sandy Desert and on the western edge of the Tanami Desert. The Community is approximately 1100km east of Broome and 250km south of Halls Creek with a population of approximately 500 – 600 people.  The Balgo Bush Medicines program is a community driven initiative to promote the use of traditional bush medicines in the community.  Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services provides bush medicines to the Balgo community through the Balgo Health Centre.

Presenters

Joanna Martin and Jamilah Bin Omar

Joanna Martin and Jamilah Bin Omar

Joanna Martin and Jamilah Bin Omar Jamilah and Joanna work together to form the KAMS Pharmacy Support Team. Jamilah is an Aboriginal Health Practitioner and is also the KAMS enior Aboriginal Medication Support Officer. Joanna is the KAMS Pharmacist. The KAMS Pharmacy Support Team is based in Broome but travels throughout the Kimberley to each Aboriginal Health Service and Renal  Health Centre. Joanna and Jamilah provide education, clinical support and training to staff and patients throughout the Kimberley.
Louise McKennaBio Coming Soon

DAY ONE

Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 11:05am - 11:30am

CARE - Building remote community capacity through training in aged care – Presented by Jessica Hawkins, Pam McLennan & Natalie Ellis

Authors

Kim Hawkins, Pam McLennan, Jessica Hawkins

Overview

The Northern Territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Training Project (NTTP) is a collaborative project between Charles Darwin University and remote communities in the Northern Territory (funded by the Australian Government Department of Health). The program started in 2009 and delivers culturally appropriate and community led training for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce employed in services in rural and remote communities across the Northern Territory. The initiative was developed to improve the capacity, quality and mix of the health workforce. Primarily to increase the supply of Indigenous and remote community health workers and facilitate a more even distribution of workforce in terms of geography and of the types of services provided. It also aims to support the Indigenous health workforce in the face of an aging population and to address the health workforce shortages in regional, rural and remote Australia.

Given the unique social and cultural circumstances of the diverse communities involved and the vast distances covered by trainers this project has adopted a community-by-community approach to training methods and extensive consultations with stakeholders and service users to ensure the sustainability of the collaboration. Outcomes for this initiative are for the whole community and specific to the community in which the training is delivered. This means each program is delivered in a unique way and influenced by the activities, desires and values of community leaders and those using aged care services.

CDU staff deliver training for this initiative at functioning aged-care facilities in remote communities with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workers employed at the facility. The nature of remote community work means trainers are required to be flexible in their delivery, able to operate with minimal support, reduced technical requirement and within constrains of community priorities.

The training environment also includes a range of learning styles and levels of literacy, numeracy and specific cultural, community and family priorities. To support this, English language, literacy and numeracy training is integrated into training on a case-by-case basis. This collaboration goes above and beyond the standard practise in training and skills development though the unique community focus of its delivery.

As trainees are currently employed in community aged care services and many have family and community commitments, CDU staff support access to training by delivering on community, cooking meals for participants, assisting with cleaning and chores and reducing barriers that may prevent trainees from attending skills development programs. The collaboration is well regarded due to the trainer’s ability to contextualise training delivery to suit audiences and to provide results for participants quite often in challenging circumstances. The flexibility of training is key, and CDU work very hard to ensure community needs are met. With the expansion of health qualifications to include allied health, CDU are keen to see how this training can be replicated to broaden the health workforce needs.

These Certificate qualifications can open pathways to further roles in healthcare and person-centred services and increases the skills required to offer day-to-day support of individuals in community settings.

Presenters

Jessica Hawkins

Jessica Hawkins

Jessica is currently a Trainer at CDU, and has worked in the health and aged care industry for a number of years in a variety of settings. Jessica holds qualifications in both nursing and paramedical science, and  is the CDU representative on the Stakeholder Group that are introducing the Allied Health Academy model in the Northern Territory. Jessica has been involved in putting together a program that will meet the needs of both future students and industry. Jessica has a strong health background and has also been part of the remote training program delivered across communities within the NT. This experience has enabled Jessica to consider learning styles and approaches to building on existing skills and knowledge.


Pam McLennan

Pam McLennan

Pam is an experienced Trainer from CDU that co-ordinates the Northern Territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Aged Care Training Project (NTTP). With a strong background in the aged care sector Pam visits many communities to provide training and is extremely well-respected.

Pam has developed an excellent rapport and training ability that engages staff in all aspects of learning and study in a respectful and culturally appropriate manner. Pam has a strong interest and experience in palliative care models and dementia. Pam advocates for a model of flexibility and strengths-based delivery in the learning environment, and believes the key to success is through the establishment of trust and transparency with Elders in the community. Pam’s motivation comes from being able to empower students and watching the strengths in giving back to community.


Natalie Ellis

Natalie Ellis

Natalie Ellis has been employed with CDU for fifteen years, primarily as Indigenous Student Support Officer. Natalie is currently seconded with the CDU Community Services team and is involved with the remote training program delivered across the Katherine region in the NT. Natalie’s Aboriginal origins are with the Dalabon people of Central Arnhem Land. Her experiences and knowledge with Aboriginal communities in the Top End of NT are invaluable when developing and delivering training to these communities. Natalie is a strong believer in equipping individuals and communities with the skills and knowledge that will empower them to take control of their own destinies. Outcomes in these learning areas can only be achieved by building relationships andtrust and having a clear understanding of the needs of the people.

CULTURES - Moorditj Djena: A Strong Step Forward – Presented by Renae Hilder & Susan Jetta

Overview

‘Moorditj Djena is a high-risk foot and diabetes education service which focuses on prevention and management of foot complications that result from poorly controlled chronic diseases e.g. diabetes, peripheral arterial disease and peripheral neuropathy for Aboriginal people.  It was identified in 2011 that there were no podiatry services provided within the Perth metropolitan area that specifically targeted the Aboriginal population. Evidence showed that diagnosis of conditions such as diabetes and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) as well as the amputation rate for the Aboriginal community within WA, was significantly higher than for non-Aboriginal people. Access to education, screening and preventative podiatry services by this client group was also limited. The need to identify those at high risk of foot problems and amputations early, particularly those as a result of chronic conditions, such as diabetes or PVD, was a high priority. Once these clients were identified, they required easy access to ongoing regular routine preventative podiatry care, education and timely referral to specialist services.

Through the Moorditj Djena Program, clients receive culturally appropriate podiatry and diabetes education services at various community clinics across the metropolitan area in a combination of community venues and using two customised mobile clinic vans.  The Moorditj Djena team provide and support a holistic approach to improving Aboriginal health by working with the Aboriginal community and other relevant health and community agencies.  Many of the clinic locations are in partnership with other agencies and stakeholders providing services to Aboriginal people, resulting in a shared care approach.

The focus of the service is to identify and manage risk factors related to foot health and diabetes, initiate recall systems and provide intervention and referrals relative to risk category.  When a client attends the Moorditj Djena Service, the Aboriginal Health Professional provides biometric feedback, health education and social support.  The Aboriginal Health Professional refers the client to the Senior Podiatrist, Senior Dietitian and/or Diabetes Educator.  Referrals to other culturally appropriate health and social services are also provided as required.

Presenters

Renae Hilder

Renae Hilder

Renae Hilder has worked in the area of Aboriginal Health for over 20 years and worked in the remote area of Wiluna and surrounding Aboriginal communities for 7 years.  Renae has an Honours degree in Psychology and a Postgraduate Diploma in Health Promotion and is passionate about ensuring equity in access to high quality health and social services for all Australians.

Renae is the Coordinator of the multi-disciplinary Moorditj Djena Team that provides podiatry and diabetes education to Aboriginal people in the Perth metropolitan area.’


Susan Jetta

Susan Jetta

Susan Jetta is a proud Aboriginal Elder from the Ballardong region of the Wheatbelt area of Western Australia. Susan was recently named Elder of the year at the 2017 Midland NAIDOC Awards. Susan has been employed with the Department of Health for a period of six years and is currently working with East Metropolitan Health Service (EMHS) Community and Population Health as an Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer in the Moorditj Djena (Strong Feet) team. Moorditj Djena is an Aboriginal specific mobile Podiatry and Diabetes Outreach Service based in Midland and is a high-risk foot and diabetes education service focusing on prevention and management of foot complications that result from poorly controlled chronic diseases such as diabetes, peripheral arterial disease and peripheral neuropathy.

Susan works as part of a team to provide primary health care and health promotion services to the Aboriginal Community in the EMHS catchment area.  Susan’s role includes providing health consultations, health education, primary health care network referrals, care coordination and health promotion services to the community whilst encouraging clients to self-manage their chronic condition. Susan actively encourages and supports clients/families/communities to engage in activities which maximises health.

In the future, Susan hopes there will be more male Aboriginal Health Workers to create more of a gender balance for cultural security in Aboriginal specific self-management programs.

Susan is currently studying an Aboriginal Leadership Program (Certificate IV in Leadership and Mentoring) at South Metropolitan TAFE in Fremantle.

CONNECTION - Interdisciplinary paediatric allied health services for urban Indigenous Australian children – Presented By Natalie Kneubuhler & Katy Curtain

Authors

Natalie Kneubuhler, Katy Curtain, Megan L Mitchell, Vanessa Smith

Overview

The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) has drawn on holistic frameworks to develop a paediatric occupational therapy (OT) and speech pathology (SP) model of care, which guides allied health professionals to deliver culturally responsive services to urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.  The IUIH Paediatric Allied Health team developed using an interdisciplinary model, and this has been instrumental in providing a meaningful and appropriate therapy service for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and their families.

The aim of this presentation is to outline the provision of IUIH paediatric occupational therapy and speech pathology services in Indigenous Community Controlled Health Services as a practical example of the implementation of collaborative, client focused and inter-professional model of care. This will comprise the holistic frameworks that guide our practices, and the practical characteristics of our services including:

  • The clinical systems which support connections between OT and SP services such as joint appointments, joint medical note writing, shared office time for planning of both individual client sessions and coordination of clinic services
  • The tools and practices that support connections between OT and SP services and their clients, including joint informal assessment practices such as yarning and play based assessment, joint goal setting, and collaborative outcome measures.
  • Connections between OT and SP and other primary health staff as part of an integrated and comprehensive approach to primary health care. These connections are built on genuine relationships, understanding of roles and multidisciplinary team practices such as team meetings and case conferences.
  • Frameworks that guide ongoing collaboration and reciprocal knowledge sharing. These frameworks support connections with clients’ and family’s ways of knowing, being and doing.

The above-mentioned features and practices of this team’s model of care have resulted in positive attendance, community feedback and holistic, meaningful outcomes across numerous Indigenous Community Controlled Health Services. The IUIH Paediatric Allied Health model of care can be seen as a practical example of delivering culturally responsive services to urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

Presenters

Natalie Kneubuhler

Natalie Kneubuhler

Natalie Kneubuhler is a proud Kuku Yalanji woman from the rural town of Innisfail in Far North Queensland. She completed her degree at the University of the Sunshine Coast, graduating with a Bachelor of Occupational Therapy in 2016. In January 2017, Natalie was employed as an Occupational Therapist at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, where she works with both adults and children. Natalie takes a holistic approach to health care, a key part of occupational therapy practice that aligns well with the Aboriginal view of health. Natalie values the importance of kinship, collaboration and cultural responsiveness in achieving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Natalie also hopes to inspire other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to consider a career in health as she believes this is an essential part of Closing the Gap.


Katy Curtin

Katy Curtin

Katy Curtain graduated from the Master of Speech Language Pathology at the University of Sydney in 2014 (MSLP), and is a certified practicing speech pathologist at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH). Katy practiced as a speech pathologist in Sydney with paediatric caseloads in both private and public services before making the move to Queensland to work for IUIH in 2016. Katy is dedicated to delivering health services that are family-centred and culturally responsive. She is driven to promote the principles of primary health care in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and enjoys working with and learning from clients and their families.

YARNING - Rehabilitation for Aboriginal people with communication disorders after stroke – Presented by Natalie Ciccone & Chantelle Timmins

Authors

Natalie Ciccone, Elizabeth Armstrong, Deborah Hersh, Mick Adams, Meaghan McAllister, Chantelle Timmins
Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australia

Background and rationale

Aboriginal Australians experience stroke up to 3 times more frequently than non-Aboriginal Australians. However, they are less likely to be admitted to stroke units and Aboriginal people are under-represented in ongoing rehabilitation services. There are currently no culturally sensitive rehabilitation treatment protocols available, and health service providers lack confidence in providing services to Aboriginal stroke survivors. This presentation will provide an overview of and preliminary results from the Wangi (talking) project (Stroke Foundation funding 2016- 2017). This project is designed to test the acceptability of a culturally tailored intervention protocol for use with Aboriginal people with acquired communication disorders (ACD) post stroke.

Methods

Up to 16 Aboriginal people with ACD post stroke are being recruited to this mixed method, multiple baseline study. The intervention involves 16 x 1 hr treatment sessions provided twice weekly. It utilises a collaborative approach to planning, integrates a yarning framework and family involvement, is provided by a speech pathologist together with an Aboriginal Co-Worker and takes place at a mutually agreed upon location. Participant acceptability is measured through an analysis of participant attendance and participant satisfaction questionnaires completed after the intervention period. Acceptability, from the perspective of the Aboriginal Co-Worker and the Speech Pathologists providing the intervention, will be obtained through semi structured interviews completed after project completion. Improvement in participant communication skills is measured through change in verbal output in conversation in which a story related to a happy memory and provide an opinion on a topical issue.

Results

Preliminary results suggest the treatment is acceptable with a high level of participant attendance. Participants have noted improvements in their communication and report that key components of the program, such as working with an Aboriginal co-worker and yarning based therapy tasks, are helpful.

Conclusion

The treatment protocol provided within the Wangi project appears to be both feasible to administer and acceptable to participants. It provides direction for rehabilitation therapists who provide services to Aboriginal stroke survivors to improve quality of care.

Presenters

Natalie Ciccone

Natalie Ciccone

Natalie Ciccone is a speech pathologist and is currently the Associate Dean of Allied Health within the School of Medical and Health Sciences at Edith Cowan University. Natalie’s primary area of research interest is aphasia- a language disorder that occurs after stroke. She is the lead investigator on the Wangi (talking) project and is currently involved in two NHMRC funded projects. The first investigating very early rehabilitation for aphasia post stroke and the second evaluating the implementation of a culturally secure intervention package for Aboriginal survivors of acquired brain injury.


Chantelle Timmins

Chantelle Timmins

Chantelle Timmins is a Koorie woman from Victoria who moved to Perth around 11 years ago. She is currently studying her Bachelor of Science in Registered Nursing and she has a Diploma in Child Services. Chantelle is currently working on the Wangi project and previously worked on the Missing Voices project.

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Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 11.35am – 12 NOON

CARE - Prevalence of diabetes related foot complications in Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Australians – Matthew West & Fiona Hawke

Authors

Matthew West, Vivienne Chuter, Fiona Hawke
School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia

Background

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community has increased risk of developing chronic illness including diabetes. Among people with diabetes, foot complications are common and make a significant contribution to the morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. In 2005, the age-standardised self-reported rate of diabetes was nearly four times greater among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people than among non- Indigenous Australians. The aim of this review was to systematically review the literature comparing the prevalence of diabetes-related foot complications in Indigenous Australians to their non-Indigenous peers.

Methods

The following electronic data bases were searched in August 2016: MEDLINE (January 1966 to present); EMBASE (January 1980 to present); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, latest issue); PUBMED (January 1966 to present); CINAHL (from 1982), and other sources.

Results

Eleven studies including a total of 157,892 participants were included. Studies were set in three states of Australia, mainly in rural and remote areas. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experienced substantially more diabetes related foot complications at a younger age than non-Indigenous Australians. In a clinical audit of all lower limb amputations in Western Australia there was a 38-fold higher rate of major lower limb amputation and a 27-fold higher rate of minor amputation among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 25 to 49 years of age with diabetes than non-Indigenous counterparts. In several studies, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders accounted for the vast majority of diabetes related foot complications while comprising only a small proportion of the regional population. There are no data available for some Australian states and for specific types of diabetes related foot complications.

Conclusions:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians suffer disproportionately from diabetes related lower limb complications, especially amputation. Evidence-based culturally appropriate screening and intervention programs are required to prevent widening of the gap in diabetes related foot complications between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians.

Presenters

Matthew West

Matthew West

Mr Matthew West is a Wiradjuri man and PhD candidate currently living and working on the Central Coast of NSW. Mr West holds concurrent positions as an Associate Lecturer and Clinical Educator at the University of Newcastle and works clinically as a podiatrist at his local Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS) Eleanor Duncan Medical Centre and is a Board Member of the Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council.


Dr Fiona Hawke

Dr Fiona Hawke is a Lecturer in Podiatry at the University of Newcastle and an academic supervisor of Matthew West’s PhD research.

CULTURES - Culture is Healing, Healing is Culture – Presented By Rayleen Councillor

Culture is Healing. Healing is Culture: Two Ways working from the space as Healer and Family Mediation Practitioner

Author

Rayleen Councillor

Overview

Having discussions about the two ways of practicing and working in mainstream bringing a Cultural and Spiritual perspective to the table which allows better negotiation in conflict resolution.   This approach allows Aboriginal people to maintain their own Cultural values, beliefs, protocols and ways of practicing.  This is what I do as a Karajarri working with healing from my role as a Family Mediator Practitioner.

Binyadi Nomore is an approach which was developed from the determination to honour ancestors and keep alive the spirit of resistance to oppression that was, and is embodied in actions which do not allow us to empower ourselves.  This way of working allows me to continue to work, with people of all cultures, towards a vision of a world where all persons are free and equal on their own terms.

I am an Indigenous Healer aware of current needs in our community and understand the significance of Cultural protocols and practices that we need to work in this space.  This is what I bring to the Mainstream Counselling and Family Dispute Resolution Practice in Anglicare.  Advancing Aboriginal ways of working by enhancing the policy and procedure framework.  Core to this framework is cultural safety and security.

My determination for better has taken me on a journey to gather the tools and resources for Binyadi Nomore.  This includes completing training in Master in Indigenous Knowledges (Mawul) with Yolngu learning healing through stories and music, collaborative approaches of healing and project development.  Indigenous Trauma Recovery and Indigenous Narrative Therapy.  These skills allow people to become experts of their own stories and take steps toward recovery through the many healing processes available to them.

Binyadi Nomore Ô – The Binyadi Nomore approach allows people to become experts of their own stories and take steps toward recovery.

Presenter

Rayleen Councillor

Rayleen Councillor
M.IndKn,B.AppSci,Dip.Coun,Dip.INT

After completing training in Master in Indigenous Knowledges (Mawul) with Yolngu learning healing through stories and music, collaborative approaches of healing and project development.  Binyadi Nomore was developed.

Qualified in Counselling, Family Dispute Resolution, Aboriginal Community Management and Development, Indigenous Trauma Recovery and Indigenous Narrative Therapy (Counselling, Group and Community Work).

CONNECTION - Service Learning for Lower Gulf Communities of North West QLD – Presented by Catrina Felton-Busch & Sabina Knight

Authors

Catrina M Felton-Busch, Sabina Knight

Abstract

Available evidence suggests that while Australia, has a healthy supply of allied health professionals, there is a significant geographical maldistribution of allied health professionals favouring metropolitan areas.  Reduced access to health services disadvantages rural and remote and particularly Indigenous Australians and results in poorer health outcomes compared with residents of urban areas.

There are a number of factors that encourage health professionals to practice in rural and remote areas, one of which is having had the opportunity to experience rural or remote practice as a student.

The Mount Isa Centre for Rural & Remote Health (MICRRH) as a University Department of Rural Health (UDRH), has long been involved in supporting students, particularly medicine and nursing to undertake clinical placement in North West Queensland. Now under its expanded scope and new funding arrangements MICRRH can focus on increasing opportunities for allied health student placements within our region.  More specifically into the communities of the lower Gulf of Carpentaria.

Access to allied health services for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people living in the lower Gulf of Carpentaria is provided by a combination of community-based services and outreach from Mount Isa as a regional service hub.  Difficulties with recruiting and retaining staff in these services is a common and vexing issue.  In addition, services facing the logistical challenges of providing a service within the geographical complexity of the region (small dispersed populations across vast distances) have limited opportunities to take students on placement. To overcome these limitations and as a starting point, MICRRH, working with the lower gulf community of Normanton, is using service learning, within an interprofessional framework, to not only provide a quality clinical placement for allied health students but to also address unmet need for allied health services in the community.

This presentation will explore the development of the MICRRH’s Service Learning model for Allied Health Services in the Lower Gulf Communities and report on the outcomes of the first interprofessional placement under this model.

The ultimate aim of the program is to develop work-ready allied health graduates who are passionate about rural and remote Indigenous health and who will subsequently be part of the allied health workforce providing culturally competent care in our communities.

Presenters

Catrina Felton-Busch

Catrina Felton-Busch

Catrina is an Aboriginal woman from Mornington Island with family ties to the Yangkaal and Gangalida people of the Gulf of Carpentaria.  Catrina is Head of Education at the Mount Isa Centre for Rural & Remote Health, James Cook University and comes from an extensive background in Indigenous Health.


Sabina Knight

Sabina Knight

Professor Sabina Knight the Director of the Mount Isa Centre for Rural and Remote Health (MICRRH), James Cook University - comes from an extensive background in remote and Indigenous primary health care, public health and education.

YARNING - Koorliny Moort (Walking with Families) Ambulatory Care Coordination Program – Presented by Debra Rose, Paul Bell & Ciara Peake

CHILD AND ALDOESCENT HEALTH SERVICES PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL KOORLINY MOORT (Walking with Families)

Authors

Debra Rose, Paul Bell, Dr Ciara Peake

AMBULATORY CARE COORDINATION PROGRAM

Western Australia Aboriginal Children are among the most socially & economically disadvantaged group, overrepresented in many negative Demographic social emotional wellbeing Health Indicators

In 2010 Western Australia primary health care providers identified a need for services for high risk Aboriginal children. In July 2012, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children (PMH) obtained funding from the COAG Closing the Gap initiative to improve ambulatory (out of hospital) care for Aboriginal children. Initially funding was to run the program in three sites (Perth metropolitan, Kimberley and Pilbara), however in July 2015 the funding changed to WA Footprints to Better Health and the program was rolled out State wide.

Aims and Objectives of our program

Koorliny Moort aims to Increase Aboriginal families’ engagement with health services and improve out of hospital care for WA Aboriginal Children, particularly those who are hard to reach. We aim to provide hospital care closer to where their families live and work.

The program is staffed by people who are trained and supported to provide high quality, responsive services to Aboriginal children.

It is a 2 stream Model of Care – Care Coordination and Paediatric Outreach Clinics.

Improve Care Coordination

  • Patient Centred Care
  • Develop partnerships with Aboriginal Medical Services and other primary care services
  • Support local health services – primary and secondary
  • Help Coordinate appointments to minimise travel and disruption.
  • Provide health advice and social, cultural and family support.
  • Initiate Telehealth Services
  • Improve hospital discharge planning and communication
  • Improve engagement with local Paediatricians and increase referrals back to local Paediatricians on discharge.

Improve Outreach Paediatric Clinics

  • Increase access to paediatric specialist outreach clinics otherwise seen at PMH.
  • Coordinate appointments closer to home.
  • Provision of Metropolitan Paediatric Outreach Clinics –are set in partnership with service providers Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service and Child and Adolescent Community Health Aboriginal Health Team deliver a holistic coordinate care “closer to home” process.
  • Fortnightly Paediatric clinics for Aboriginal Children at PMH.
  • Help to locate children in towns and communities.
  • Provide feedback of outcomes and follow up.

Inclusion Criteria

West Australian Aboriginal children aged 0-16 years that have any planned follow-up at Princess Margaret Hospital or King Edward Memorial Hospital.

Referrals:

  • Children with complex medical needs
  • Preterm infants
  • Children who have been difficult to reach
  • Children whose families request review closer to homes and country

Since Commencement

We have had 2373 children enrolled into the program from August 2012 to June 2017 – Perth Metro 54.7% (1285) Kimberley 22% (525) the Pilbara 12% (285) the Goldfields 4%(99) The Midwest 3% (106) and the Southern 3%(73)

Our Active Enrolments as at 27/6/2017 stands at 808

Metro (clinic):354, Metro non – clinic 148, Kimberley 133, Pilbara 72, Goldfields 28, Midwest 52 and Southern 21

Yearly evaluations are conducted and measurable outcomes show improvement in clinic attendance rates, reduced emergency department presentations and hospital admissions and reduced length of stay.

Our Goal

is to facilitate the delivery of the right health care service, in the right order, at the right time and in the right setting

Presenters

Debra Rose

Debra Rose

Debra Rose is a Gamilaraay Woman from NW New South Wales town of Walgett and has been a visitor to Noongar Land (Perth WA) for the past 18 years. Debra’s was the Senior Criminal Justice Officer in South  Australia  for  the  Royal  Commission  into  Aboriginal  Deaths  in Custody. During 2000 - 2002 worked with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women in WA in designing and implementing the WA Health’s Aboriginal Women’s Cervical Cancer Prevention Program.

Debra has worked in the areas of Aboriginal Alternative Dispute Resolution Service with the WA Attorney Generals, Senior Programs Officer with WA Corrective Services facilitating the cultural specific Aboriginal Perpetrators Family Domestic Violence Program and was Deputy Chief Executive Officer for WA Aboriginal Legal Services. Debra is also one of the founding members of the National Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Women’s Legal Services (1990 to current day) with an emphasis on Family and Domestic Violence.


Dr Ciara Peake

Dr Ciara Peake

Dr Ciara Peake. Paediatrician - Koorliny Moort, Princess Margaret Hospital. Ciara is a General Paediatrician with a special interest in Aboriginal Health. She completed her medical training in Western Australia and has been employed by Princess Margaret Hospital for Children for the past 12 years. Throughout her training and career she has spent time developing her skills and interests in several remote and regional areas of Western Australia.


Paul Bell

Paul Bell

Paul Bell – Koorliny Moort, Princess Margaret Hospital.Paul is a nurse who has been working in Aboriginal Health for approximately 4 years. He has worked at Princess Margaret Hospital for the last 13 years. After completing his nurse training he worked at several locations in the UK. eventually moving to Perth WA.

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Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 12.05pm – 12.30pm

CARE -Comprehensive Physiotherapy care to Indigenous People in South East Queensland – Presented by Lowana Williams

Author

Lowana Williams

Physiotherapy care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is required across the lifespan and includes acute muscular injuries, falls prevention and management, women’s health, paediatric therapy and chronic pain management. Those who are unable to afford physiotherapy are required to navigate complex, confusing and limited health services which can act as a barrier to many Indigenous people accessing physiotherapy. However, through the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents of South East Queensland are able to access affordable, convenient and comprehensive physiotherapy care.

The aim of this presentation is to describe the development of a physiotherapy service connected to a comprehensive Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled setting. This service has grown from 1 Physiotherapist to 5.5 FTE Physiotherapists over the past 3 years and has transitioned from a contractor model to employed staff. This has enabled the Physiotherapy service to be embedded within a primary health care setting and connected with the GP’s, nurses, Aboriginal Health workers, receptionists, transport officers as well as other allied health professions. Although the majority of physiotherapy is provided in the clinic setting, therapy is also provided at schools, aged care facilities and client’s homes. Schedules are aligned to enable connections across disciplines which assists staff to learn in an inter-professional model and also improves client outcomes. The work of IUIH physiotherapists extends beyond that of client care and involves connecting clients with other parts of the health and education systems and connecting with other health professionals to develop manual handling training for the organisation and associated clinics. Workforce growth and development will also be described in this presentation.

Presenter

Lowana Williams

Lowana Williams

Lowana is of Yugambeh decent and grew up in Brisbane. She commenced working as a physiotherapist in 2009 after completing a Masters of Physiotherapy at the University of Sydney and a Bachelor of Exercise Science through Griffith University. She has worked in the public, private and community sectors of Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and the United Kingdom. She is currently working in Brisbane at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health where she provides clinical care, supervises students and lectures at the University of Queensland. Through her work she has had the opportunity to attend the National Indigenous Cricket Championships as the physiotherapist for Queensland for the past two years. In addition to her IAHA membership, Lowana is also on the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Committee of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. She is currently studying a Masters of Public Health and Tropical Medicine at James Cook University.

CULTURES - Northern Territory Aboriginal Health Academy Partnership – Kylie Stothers & Sharon Wallace

Overview

AMSANT and IAHA have worked in partnership to create this NT lead innovative training model which is about re-shaping and re-designing how training is delivered to Aboriginal high school students.  In order to build a culturally responsive health workforce for the future we need to be introducing potential health career pathways to our young people. The model is centered on ensuring that training and education is delivered in a way that embeds the centrality of culture and leadership, whilst having a holistic approach to health.  The NT Aboriginal Health Academy Project (NTAHAP) model is designed to work collaboratively across health disciplines, and organizational structures (health, education, training, employment) to improve and increase the opportunities for Aboriginal high school students to achieve positive outcomes for their lives and their families, through mentoring, family partnerships and positive peer relationships.  This program is designed to be transferable to other communities to meet their local health and wellbeing needs for sustainable workforce development solutions that lead to building community capacity and ultimately young Aboriginal men and women taking up careers in health.

Presenters

Kylie Stothers

Kylie Stothers

Kylie Stothers is a mother of two children and a Jawoyn woman who was born and raised in Katherine, NT. Kylie comes from a large extended family with strong ties in Katherine and surrounding communities. Kylie is the Workforce Development Officer at Indigenous Allied Health Australia and is a social worker who has worked throughout the Northern Territory for over 18 years. She previously worked for the Centre for Remote Health and Flinders University NT at the Katherine site and her interest areas are in child and maternal health, working with families, health promotion, child protection and health workforce issues. Kylie is passionate about education, health and issues that relate to remote and rural Australia.


Sharon Wallace

Sharon Wallace

As a proud Wangkumarra woman from SW Queensland she has lived and worked in the Northern Territory for over 17 yrs, her first responsibility being to her family as a mother, kinship carer, Aunty and matriarch in the family now that her mum and dad have passed on from Cancer. Sharon is a Senior Aboriginal Health Practitioner (AHP) and has been for 22 yrs, and has also completed her Master of Public Health. She has held positions in the NT in Katherine, Nhulunbuy and now Darwin; and has worked as a Clinician, in Health Promotion, AHP Education and VET Lecturer, and has been working at AMSANT for 7 years first employed as an Indigenous Health Project Officer (IHPO) and now as a Workforce Policy Officer. Sharon’s role is supporting approx. 80 trainee and registered Aboriginal Health Practitioners in the NT Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Sector and she also represents AHPs on a number of advisory, working and governance groups and boards as an advocate and Primary Health Care professional with a strong focus on research, policy/strategy development and implementation. Her role is not limited to just support for Aboriginal Health Practitioners but all Aboriginal staff employed within Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in the NT.

CONNECTION - An Optometry initiative to increase the eye health workforce – David Aanundsen & Lauren Hutchinson

Authors

(1) David Aanundsen (2) Lauren Hutchinson

Organisations:

(1) The Fred Hollows Foundation (The Foundation), Indigenous Australia Program (IAP) and the (2) Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) are collaborating on a workforce initiative to support a student get optometry work experience in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Optometry primary care setting.

What are the aims of the presentation?

This presentation will describe:

  • the experience and lessons learnt working in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary care setting.
  • how the collaborative project contributes to a model of integrated eye care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a primary care setting in South East Queensland

Presentation details

There are currently very few Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people working as Optometrists. This project is about encouraging Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Optometry students to consider working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander eye care in a primary care situation. This work placement style initiative aims to provide a more detailed opportunity to gain experience working with a team of eye health professionals in a primary care setting. Regular visits to local clinics around south-east Queensland and skilled supervision hope to provide a positive experience that will bring more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people into the eye health workforce. As a trial measure it has been very successful.

The presentation will focus on Lauren Hutchinson’s experience over the last twelve months as well as talk about how the partnership between IUIH and The Foundation aim to increase workforce capacity and encourage more Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to work in the eye health sector.

Who are the organisations?

The Foundation works through direct partnerships with local service providers and focusses on the development and implementation of sustainable solutions in the current eye health system for people living in underserviced, rural and remote communities.

IUIH operates on a regional hub and spoke model that leads the planning, development and coordination of health service delivery to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population in SEQ. The IUIH was established in 2009 by the four Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services in SEQ to provide for the needs of Australia’s second largest Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. Since its inception the regional network has expanded to include 18 multidisciplinary primary health clinics, with more clinics planned in the future.

Presenters

David Aanundsen

David Aanundsen

David Aanundsen is a Development Effectiveness Program Officer in the Indigenous Australia Program of The Fred Hollows Foundation. David is a Yamatji man from Perth and currently residing in Darwin. He has worked in various roles in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health for the past 18 years.


Lauren Hutchinson

Lauren Hutchinson

Lauren Hutchinson is a Wiradjuri woman, born and raised in the small town of Molong NSW. She is currently living in Brisbane undertaking a Bachelor of Vision Science/Masters of Optometry Degrees of which she is about to graduate from.

YARNING - Integrating care, connection and culture to Aboriginal health and well-being – Tracey Brand

Authors

Tracey Brand

Overview

The Central Australian Aboriginal Congress (Congress) is an Aboriginal community controlled health services in Alice Springs.  It is one of the largest Aboriginal community controlled health services in the country.  Congress has developed a comprehensive model of primary health care delivering quality, evidence-based services, based on the foundation of cultural safe, accessible, responsive and client focused.

Congress delivers whole of life care, from maternal to end of life and everything in between. Congress employs a multidisciplinary team of over 400 staff and invest heavily in support services to compliment and strengthen its care services including an internal cross-cultural induction program, developed and delivered by Aboriginal staff, a cultural adviser, a team of Aboriginal interpreters and an Aboriginal Staff Advisory Committee that provides advice to the Chief Executive Officer to ensure services remain culturally safe and strong.  Staff are guided by a set of local cultural protocols that guide staff in service delivery.

The presentation will focus on Congress’ comprehensive primary health care model and the integral role of allied health services in delivering integrated clinical based and outreach services to Aboriginal clients in Alice Springs and remote Aboriginal communities in Central Australia. The presentation will share Congress’ model that encapsulate an integrated life span approach to care, culture and connection to improve health and well-being outcome for Aboriginal people.

Presenter

Tracey Brand

Tracey Brand

Tracey Brand is an Eastern Arrernte woman born and raised in Alice Springs. She is the General Manager of Health Services at the Central Australian Aboriginal Congress.

Tracey has over twenty years of experience in leading Aboriginal service delivery across Aboriginal community controlled organisations and the Northern Territory Government.  She holds a Master of Business Leadership, Master of Business Administration and a Masters of Arts in Aboriginal Administration.

Tracey represents Congress on Aboriginal issues on Territory and national committees and is an active Director on two local Aboriginal community controlled boards.

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DAY TWO

Wednesday 29 November 2017 - 11.05am - 11.30am

CARE - Opening the Conversation about access to health care for Aboriginal People – Amanda Bailey & Nadia Di Girolamo

Authors

Amanda M Bailey, Nadia M Di Girolamo
Occupational Therapy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia

Background

This project, entitled ‘Opening the Conversation’, was conducted by two 4th year Occupational Therapy students from the University of South Australia working in conjunction with Reconciliation SA. The project ran for 9 weeks, between February and April 2017 following a period of scoping in August 2016 and pre-project relationship building from November 2016.

Aim

The aim of the project was “to open a conversation about the cultural biases and assumptions of mainstream healthcare systems and how they can create barriers to appropriate access to health services for Aboriginal people.”

Approach

The project was undertaken in response to the identified barriers to appropriate healthcare access for the Aboriginal Community, and the significant gaps in health outcomes between the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal population. The project worked with two communities in Adelaide, the Aboriginal Community as health consumers, and a community of healthcare professionals. Responding to the complexities of this issue, the project was conducted as a 9 week needs analysis, as decided in consultation with the steering committee. The underpinnings of the project were social justice, equity and community empowerment. The Aboriginal Community was consulted throughout the project. The information gathering process was centred on yarning, shared knowledge and understanding.

Key results

The project identified two key elements of access (appropriateness and acceptability) that were explored in further detail during the needs analysis. The project experienced great traction, illustrated by the interest shown by key stakeholders and the willingness of the Community to engage in the yarning process. Several conversations were opened at an executive level, with senior Aboriginal Health Professionals within the Adelaide Local Health Networks, expressing interest in the project findings. Opening the Conversation identified several gaps in service provisions, such as the lack of Aboriginal specific services in Southern Adelaide and a lack of youth and allied health services in Adelaide. Further key finding in the project included the role structure of Aboriginal Liaison Officers (ALO) within mainstream health and how this affected health outcomes for both the ALO and client.

Conclusion

The project sought to name and open conversations about the barriers systemic racism poses for the Aboriginal Community and was successful in this endeavour. Input from the Aboriginal Community and from professionals within Adelaide health services allowed great depth and breadth to be covered by the project in a short time. The interest shown from the various stakeholders validated that systemic racism is an important issue. The interest the project generated at an executive level in the health sector aided in strengthening relationships between the agency, and stakeholders in a position to influence systemic change. The findings of this project are being used by Reconciliation SA to advocate for change in health systems that pose barriers for the Aboriginal Community in Adelaide.

The presentation will discuss the aims, methods, project findings as well as how the project has been sustained and developed over a six-month timeframe by Reconciliation SA.

Presenters

Amanda Bailey

Amanda Bailey

Amanda Bailey is a Ngarrindjeri woman, a wife and a mother of four children.

I am a 37 year old, 4th year Occupational Therapy student living in Adelaide. I have always wanted to work in a field that helps people, I began as an enrolled nurse, before studying occupational therapy. After my study is completed, I hope to work in the field of palliative care as an occupational therapist. Occupational therapists can enable clients to achieve an end of life experience that is meaningful to them individually, both culturally and personally, and this is something I would like to help be a part of.


Nadia M Di Girolamo

Nadia M Di Girolamo

Nadia M Di Girolamo is a 29 year old Occupational Therapy student with an interest in community health and development, paediatrics and Aboriginal health.

I have a degree in Graphic Design, however after completing my studies I realised I wasn’t fulfilled by that job role and wanted to help people. I stumbled upon occupational therapy in the university course guide, got accepted into the degree and have never looked back. Occupational therapy resonates with me as it has such a diverse application and unique approach to helping and understanding people. It allows patients to be the pilots in their own health journey, which I believe in especially important for achieving meaningful health and wellbeing outcomes.

CULTURES - Exploring new ways that introduce families to Allied Health Services – Jadnah Davies & Sue Thomas

Overview

This presentation will showcase an innovative way to introduce families to the benefits of allied health. A therapeutic camp that gives children opportunities to have targeted intensive therapies while building parents and carers knowledge of therapeutic interventions. The camp is one part of the process of providing services to remote communities using new ways of working including new technologies.

Presenters

Jadnah Davies

Jadnah Davies

Jadnah Davies is a 27 year old mother of 3 and has lived in Fitzroy Crossing since she was 3, she is connected to the Fitzroy Valley through her maternal grandmother, a Gooniyandi women who was removed from the Fitzroy Valley in 1934. Jadnah completed her secondary education in Fitzroy Crossing via Distance Education and has worked for Marninwarntikura Women’s Resource Centre since 2012 in various roles. She started working on the final stage of the Lililwan Project, the FASD prevalence study, as a community navigator feeding back research findings to communities. The Marulu Strategy, designed to Make FASD History shapes the work of the Marulu Unit. The major focus of this work is to support children and families impacted by FASD and Early Life Trauma. Jadnah is very passionate and committed to progressing the work of the Marulu Strategy, knowing the ongoing benefits it has to her community’s future.


Sue Thomas

Sue Thomas

Sue Thomas has worked and lived in the Kimberley as a teacher, principal, researcher and education consultant. She has worked on a number of national Indigenous education projects and is building a professional learning community raising awareness and connecting people working to address the needs of children and young people living with FASD. Sue is currently the Marulu FASD and ELT Strategy Coordinator working with key stakeholders to make FASD history.

CONNECTION - Connecting Fathers – What we’ve learned from Strong Fathers Program – Sharon Gough & Jon Blurton

Authors

Michelle Blogna1, Sharon Gough2, Jon Blurton3

  1. LIFT Program, Indigo Junction, MIDLAND, WA, Australia
  2. Indigo Junction, MIDLAND, Western Australia, Australia
  3. Strong Fathers’ Program, Indigo Junction, MIDLAND, Western Australia, Australia

Overview

A twenty-minute presentation by Sharon Gough, Michelle Blogna and Jon Blurton will outline the success of The Strong Fathers’ Program. It has been going through the process with its funding body to become evidence based itself. However, there is an evidence base which confirms that supporting fathers and connecting them to supports, Community and Culture promotes positive outcomes and with longitudinal research, this will in turn show vast improvements in generations to come.

The presentation shows the evidence base surrounding the Strong Fathers’ Project, some history of fathering and how colonisation had a devastating effect on fathering and fathering roles in Aboriginal and Indigenous households. The presentation will then focus on the strength-based, solution-focused model of connecting fathers and what the mounting evidence base says about the role of Aboriginal and Indigenous fathering roles and the importance of father-inclusive practice to bring about real change. For example:

Traditional Aboriginal fathering roles were reported as being “intimate, caring and involved” (Hammond, Lester, Fletcher and Pascoe, 2004, p. 5). It is since colonization that the role of the father has become undermined and devalued in the Aboriginal family setting (Collard, Adams, Palmer & McMullan, 2016). Furthermore, there is an urgent need for support and resources to be directed to programs that will overcome the barriers to positive outcomes for Aboriginal fathers (Hammond, et al., 2004; Hammond, 2010).

Indigo Junction saw a vital need for father-inclusive practices which is echoed by a range of other authors (Berlyn, Wise & Soriano, 2008; Fleming & King, 2010; Cameron, Coady, & Hoy, 2014; Fletcher, May, St George, Stoker & Oshan, 2014; and Stuart, May and Hammond, 2015). Furthermore, it is of particular importance to engage Aboriginal/Indigenous fathers and fathers of Aboriginal/Indigenous children.

The role of the father in Aboriginal households was in need of supports. Women were engaging in supports, however, fathers were being overlooked in service provision. Indigo Junction saw the need for the family to progress at the same pace. Applying Bronfenbrenner’s (1977) Ecological Systems Theory, Indigo Junction identified that fathers living within emergency and transitional housing lacked interconnectedness across ecological systems.  Intervening in a way that built connections to family, peers, services, neighbours, community, policies and culture was critical as it is through these connections that Bronfenbrenner believes humans develop the environmental supports and coping skills required to embark on a process of transition and development.

Clare and Oakley (2017) and Collard and colleagues (2016) report that the aftermath of colonisation and subsequent forced removal of children negatively impacted Aboriginal families. Yeo (2003) also confirms colonisation is still impacting on Aboriginal families. There remains a deficit in parenting skills as well as experiences of unresolved grief, trauma, depression and mental illness which is linked to substance abuse issues (Clare & Oakley, 2017).

Indigo Junction are proud of its success and have had the privilege of having on board Professor Mike Clare who has been helpful in putting forward submissions for the program to be Evidence Based in itself.

Presenters

Sharon Gough

Sharon Gough

Coming from a background in the Education Department, Sharon moved into the role of Program Manager at Indigo Junction (formerly Swan Emergency Accommodation) around five years ago. Since she has arrived, Sharon has been a trail blazer in implementing Trauma Informed Care and Practice into Indigo Junction, including bringing all policies and procedures into line to ensure that every level of Indigo Junction is trauma informed.

At the time of writing this bio’, Sharon is overseas as one of the 106 Australians chosen in 2016 for a Churchill Fellowship. She has travelled to New Zealand and Canada in search of new ideas, innovation and excellence with regards to transitioning from care arrangements and better ways to support Indigenous Communities. Sharon is an experienced, energetic and impassioned public speaker.


Jon Blurton

Jon Blurton

From his first job at 13 years old selling newspapers on St George’s Terrace, Perth for $20 per week, Jon comes to Indigo Junction with a wealth of knowledge and experience. Jon has worked in administration, mining and Community Development and Employment Programs.

Jon is a Noongar man from the Balladong mob and has been an asset to Indigo Junction. When he moved into the role of the Strong Fathers’ Program worker, he brought with him lived experience and the wealth of knowledge from a vast and varied career. Jon is a single father to three beautiful girls who are his life and love.

We are proud to have Jon at Indigo Junction and see the program grow and flourish since Jon has been at the helm. Jon is happy to be co-presenting the Connecting Fathers – What we’ve learned from the Strong Fathers’ Program with Sharon Gough.

Michelle Blogna has a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work and has worked many roles at Indigo Junction including working with youth, families and predominately in homelessness prevention. Currently, Michelle is working with complex care leavers which she finds very rewarding. Michelle has worked on providing the Evidence Base for the Strong Fathers’ Project and is a passionate part of the Indigo Junction team looking to improve outcomes for the people in her community.

COLLABORATION - Jiji – Community-initiated interprofessional, student lead program in remote communities – Cheryl Davis & Lorna Rosenwax

Authors

Victoria Bishop1, Ann Carruthers1, Cheryl Davis1, Christine Drury1, Carolyn Jones1, Julie Morriss1, Caitlin Prince1, Lorna Rosenwax1, Cori Williams1, Coral Wrona2

  1. Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  2. Western Desert Lands Aboriginal Corporation, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Aim

To provide access to quality, sustainable health services to children and families living in the remote communities of Jigalong and Punmu while offering unique training opportunities to Curtin Health Sciences students.

Content

Martu leaders and Curtin University embarked on a partnership to improve outcomes for Martu children. The Jiji (‘little children’) Program began in the remote communities of Jigalong and Punmu in May 2016 and continues in 2017. Jiji is based on the successful model operating at Challis Community School where student-led service delivery has resulted in significant child health, academic and social improvements. Jiji is guided by the principles of community based rehabilitation and family-centred practice, and was initially funded for two years. It aims to:

  • Improve Aboriginal children’s health and education access.
  • Build the capacity of parents and teachers.
  • Engage the communities in healthcare, by working with families and their children together.
  • Improve recruitment of health professionals to remote areas.

To achieve these aims, Jigalong and Punmu each host a team consisting of a speech pathology and occupational therapy supervisor, and final year Curtin University speech pathology and occupational therapy students. Each team lives in community for a five-week placement, with three blocks occurring between May and October of each year. Students are provided with a week-long Indigenous curriculum content pre-placement and a week-long post-placement debrief placement. The pre-placement content includes ‘Working in Remote Aboriginal Communities’ (e.g. history, past government policies, people) and understanding Aboriginal Ways of Working. Using the NATSI Health Curriculum Framework for ‘Entry to Practice’ students, students are expected to:

  • Design strategies to incorporate knowledge of Aboriginal culture and concepts of health and wellbeing into health care practice to enhance cultural safety.
  • Establish strategies to work in partnership with Aboriginal health professionals, organisations and communities, and devise a plan to respectfully acquire cultural information.
  • Develop strategies for mitigating the potential challenges of different cultural values and behaviours between Aboriginal clients and mainstream health care practices.
  • Devise strategies for diagnosing and treating Aboriginal clients from the perspective of the social determinants of health.
  • Development of interprofessional practice capabilities is also required.

Evidence from an independent evaluation indicates the high level of success and acceptance of Jiji at multiple levels: Martu families and children; school staff; and diverse external agencies. It also indicates the increased cultural sensitivities, skill acquisition and interprofessional prowess gained by the students.

This presentation reports on Jiji in terms of respect, understanding, learning and transformation. It presents some practicalities of setting up and maintaining the program. Jiji demonstrates that the provision of an interprofessional, student lead, community-based rehabilitation service is able to meet the needs of multiple stakeholders. Importantly, it provides evidence for rethinking the delivery of services in regional and remote Australia.

Presenters

Professor Lorna Rosenwax

Professor Lorna Rosenwax

Lorna is the Deputy Pro Vice-Chancellor, Health Sciences at Curtin University.  She is an occupational therapist and population health researcher.  Lorna grew up in regional Western Australia and has a strong affinity with the land. She is one of the primary instigators of Jiji - a Martu - Curtin initiative, having worked closely with community members from the remote Martu communities of Punmu and Jigalong, Western Desert Lands Aboriginal Corporation, and other key stakeholders to bring Jiji to fruition.


Cheryl Davis

Cheryl Davis

I am a Noongar woman, of the Yuet and Balladong clans of the Noongar Nation. I was born in Perth, Western Australia.  I completed year 10 high school but didn’t have any career aspirations.  So, I commenced my career as a receptionist/secretary working in various legal services.  About 10 years later, with limited career opportunities, I completed an enabling program and commenced law and arts - but neither subjects inspired me.  In 1999, I applied for an administration job at the Centre for Aboriginal Studies, Curtin University.  Here I became inspired, especially around education, given that most staff were Indigenous, had university qualifications, and were teaching Indigenous studies to Indigenous and non-Indigenous students.  A few months later, I enrolled into a health sciences degree at University of Sydney. I really enjoyed my studies and subsequently won the Charles Perkins Scholarship Award for an Indigenous student attaining the highest aggregate marks over the course of my degree.  During my studies, I commenced teaching in the Indigenous Community Health program.  I really enjoyed the teaching experiences and loved watching Indigenous students grow in confidence, complete their qualifications and graduate with a new sense of pride. Some 18 years later, I have a strategic leadership role within the Faculty of Health Sciences.  I still love the university environment especially for Indigenous students, who today, have the opportunity of studying medicine, physiotherapy, psychology and pharmacy.  Building an Indigenous health workforce is significant if we are going to ‘Close the Gap’ in Indigenous life expectancy and disadvantage.

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Wednesday 29 November 2017 - 11.35am - 12 NOON

CARE - ‘Culture is inclusion’: A community-driven approach for the social inclusion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability – Scott Avery

Author

Scott Avery, Policy and Research Director, First Peoples Disability Network (Australia)
PhD Candidate, University of Technology Sydney

Overview

This presentation will outline the results of a community-based research project conducted by First Peoples Disability Network (FPDN) which contributes to a better understanding of the nature and prevalence of disability amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience disability at more than twice the rate of other Australians and experience inequality across a spectrum of health, wellbeing and social indicators (ABS, 2017), however the research and evidence base which informs practice and policy is thin.

FPDN adopts a ‘numbers and the narratives’ approach to its research, which brings together statistical datasets with oral testimony from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability. This unique approach highlights the breadth of issues that affect people with disability as well as its human impact. The data demonstrates the overwhelmingly adverse intersectional impact of being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and having disability across a range of wellbeing and social indicators including health, educational attainment, employment participation, personal safety and exposure to the criminal justice system.

The one startling exception to the inequalities that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability experience is participation in cultural activities. When Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples with disability participate in Indigenous cultural activities, such as ceremony and use of native languages, they participate at the same rate as other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It is only when the protective force of their culture and community is absent, and they interact with the western systems in health, education and justice, that inequality and disadvantage materialises.

This research highlights an Indigenous worldview of humanity where the cultural norm is inclusion and where ‘dis’ in ‘disability’ is largely absent. This core finding shows culture is the foundation upon which the unique health and social inequities experienced by Indigenous peoples with disability can be addressed. It also provides an opportunity for practitioners and policy-makers to critically reflect on the true meaning of culturally competence in understanding the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability.

Presenter

Scott Avery

Scott Avery

Scott Avery is descendant from the Worimi people and is the Policy and Research Director at the First Peoples Disability Network (Australia), a non-Government Organisation constituted by and for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples with disability. He has an extensive career in research and public policy in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs, disability, health justice and education. He is undertaking a doctorate in Aboriginal disability at University of Technology, Sydney (Australia) and is the lead Investigator on ‘Living our ways’, a community-directed research program which has been awarded funding support through the National Disability Research and Development Scheme. He has been appointed to numerous expert advisory groups for the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and other government agencies and is a recipient of a research support scholarship through the Lowitja Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research.

CULTURES - Missing Voices: Aboriginal peoples’ stories informing brain injury rehabilitation services – Elizabeth Armstrong & Catelyn Dowell

Authors

Elizabeth Armstrong1, Natalie Ciccone1, Deborah Hersh1, Meaghan McAllister1, Catelyn Dowell1, Juli Coffin2, Sandra Thompson3, Judy Katzenellenbogen4, 5, Leon Flicker4, Colleen Hayward1, Deborah Woods6

  1. Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  2. University of Notre Dame, Broome, Western Australia, Australia
  3. Western Australian Centre for Rural Health, University of Western Australia, Geraldton, Western Australia, Australia
  4. University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  5. Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
  6. Geraldton Regional Aboriginal Medical Service, Geraldton, Western Australia, Australia

Background

Stroke and traumatic brain injury are significant and likely under-identified health issues in Aboriginal communities.  They are both known to occur up to three times more frequently in Aboriginal Australians than non-Aboriginal Australians. To date, little is known of Aboriginal people’s experiences of these conditions or specifically of their experience of resultant acquired communication disorders (ACD) – the area of focus in this paper. Aboriginal people are under-represented in brain injury rehabilitation services and these services are traditionally staffed by Allied Health Professionals.

Aims

The Missing Voices project (NHMRC#1046228, funded 2013-2016) aimed to document the extent and impact of ACD in Aboriginal people and families within Western Australia.  This was the first step in a journey towards Aboriginal peoples’ perspectives informing brain injury rehabilitation services.

Methods

Thirty two Aboriginal people with an experience of acquired communication disorder (aphasia, dysarthria or cognitive-communication disorder) after a stroke or traumatic brain injury and 17 family members were referred to the Missing Voices project. Participants came from urban, rural and remote communities across Western Australia and shared their stories during semi-structured interviews undertaken by the eight Aboriginal interviewers employed during the course of the project.

Topics explored during the ‘research yarn’ included participants’ hospital experiences and follow up, living with ACD, assistance required immediately after and since the brain injury and suggestions for improving access to assistance and rehabilitation services.  The videotaped interviews were transcribed and analysed utilising thematic analysis. Member checking occurred where possible.

Results

Initial themes from the interviews related to dislocation from family and country affecting ongoing rehabilitation options, a need for more flexible outpatient rehabilitation services and more information on community services available, systemic problems with communication in hospitals, need for practical information to manage long-term issues, inevitability of stroke, and individual stories of moving forward.  The presentation will explore the findings to date and include reflections from one local Aboriginal interviewer.

Discussion

Results show a mixed range of experiences. Many stories showed that the communication disorder was often embedded in broader health issues rather than being a primary focus of discussion. The findings indicate a need for the development of more culturally accessible rehabilitation services. To address this, a National Health & Medical Research Council partnership grant was successfully sought with partners including metropolitan and regional hospitals in Western Australia, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisations, local neurological nursing care providers and the Stroke Foundation.  The Partnership Project entitled ‘Enhancing rehabilitation after brain injury in Aboriginal Australians’ (#1132468) will trial a model for culturally accessible rehabilitation services and the model for this will be presented.

Presenters

Professor Elizabeth Armstrong

Professor Elizabeth Armstrong

Professor Elizabeth Armstrong is Foundation Chair in Speech Pathology at Edith Cowan University in Perth. She has published widely in the area of aphasia after stroke and presents regularly at both national and international speech pathology, linguistics, allied health and medical conferences.  Beth leads a strong multidisciplinary team of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers exploring the experiences of Aboriginal brain injury survivors and their families. The team has been funded by organisations including the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, the NH&MRC, the Western Australian Department of Health and the Stroke Foundation to support this work which is focused on improving service delivery and quality of life for Aboriginal brain injury survivors. Beth is also currently building an international team from Canada, New Zealand, Australia and South Africa which is the first to examine commonalities in Indigenous experiences of brain injury and related services internationally.


Catelyn Dowell

Catelyn Dowell

Catelyn Dowell is a Gija woman from Warmun Community (Turkey Creek) in the East Kimberley of Western Australia.  Born in Darwin and raised on country, Catelyn reflects on the freedom she had growing up in Warmun and says the best thing about it was knowing that she was part of something, growing up with highly respected old people, the pillars of the community; Elders who had so much culture and knowledge.  Catelyn was guided through her childhood by the ‘amazing old people’ that were her grandparents and also by her Mother who deliberately chose to raise her children in community so they could grow up around their mob.  Catelyn attended boarding school in Perth before taking up positions at home in the Kimberley.  Catelyn lives and works in Broome and joined the Missing Voices project in 2014.

CONNECTION - Implementing the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework – Leanne Pilkington, Lauren Kinsella & Meaghan McCambridge

Authors

Lauren Kinsella, Meaghan McCambridge, Jennifer Chynoweth, Helen Zorbas, Louise De Busch,  Leanne Pilkington
Cancer Australia, Surry Hills, NSW, Australia

Aim

To drive a national, shared, strategic approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cancer control in Australia, informed by the Framework.

Background

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are 30% more likely to die from cancer than non-Indigenous Australians.

Cancer Australia developed the first nationally agreed strategic framework to guide future directions in cancer control for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Development was underpinned by a collaborative, evidence-based and consultative approach which resulted in seven agreed priorities:

  1. Improving knowledge, attitudes and understanding
  2. Focusing prevention activities
  3. Increasing access to and participation in cancer screening
  4. Ensuring early diagnosis
  5. Ensuring optimal and culturally appropriate care
  6. Ensuring families and carers are supported
  7. Strengthening services and systems to deliver good quality, integrated services

There was consensus at a national forum of key stakeholders that implementation of these priorities is a shared opportunity and a shared responsibility.

Method

  1. Cancer Australia established a Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control to help drive the national implementation and encourage cross-sector collaboration in addressing the seven priorities.
  2. Cancer Australia is facilitating the adoption and implementation of the Cancer Framework in order to enhance national, jurisdictional, regional and local efforts to improve Indigenous cancer outcomes.
  3. Cancer Australia is currently addressing Priorities 1, 3, 5 and 7.

Results

  1. The Leadership Group continues to guide implementation
  2. The Cancer Framework has enhanced cancer plans, policies and frameworks
  3. Cancer Australia is undertaking a range of initiatives which directly address several priorities:
  • developing a monitoring and reporting framework to report on progress towards implementation and inform future national cancer control initiatives for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • building the capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and Health Workers on cancer awareness, prevention and early detection
  • identifying critical success factors for Indigenous women participating in mammographic screening
  • developing an Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer
  • providing grants to support people with cancer
  • strengthening national cancer data capacity through the development of data on cancer stage, treatments and recurrence; and the regular reporting of key cancer control indicators

Conclusion

Cancer Australia’s engagement and strong collaborative approach to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities was integral to the development of a shared agenda to improve Indigenous cancer outcomes in Australia.

Cancer Australia, working closely with the Leadership Group, is driving national implementation of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework to improve cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Presenters

Leanne Pilkington

Leanne Pilkington

Leanne is a Nyoongar yorga from Binjarep country in WA. She was the Aboriginal Program Officer at BreastScreen WA for 11 years and is currently on secondment to WA Country Health Service as Program Manager Statewide Aboriginal Liaison. She is passionate about Aboriginal health, especially women’s health and cancer issues. Leanne has presented at various State, National and international conferences and delivered cross-cultural awareness training to various agencies.


Lauren Kinsella

Lauren Kinsella

Lauren Kinsella is a Senior Project Officer in the Indigenous and Rural team at Cancer Australia. In this role, Lauren has been involved in the development and implementation of many projects aimed at improving cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This has included managing the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Framework project and developing resources for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and Health Practitioners. Prior to joining Cancer Australia in 2012, Lauren worked in curriculum development at Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education in Darwin.


Meaghan McCambridge

Meaghan McCambridge

Meaghan McCambridge is a Project Officer in the Indigenous and Rural team at Cancer Australia. Most recently, Meaghan has played a key role in developing the Optimal Care Pathway for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with cancer, which will guide the delivery of consistent, culturally appropriate, high quality and evidence based care. Meaghan is also the secretariat of Cancer Australia’s Leadership Group on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Control.

COLLABORATION - The Quinine Project: Building a locally responsive allied health workforce – Lesa Towers & Michelle Lincoln

Authors

Lesa Towers1, Michelle Lincoln2, Kim Bulkeley2, Angela Firth3, Richard Cheney3, Phil Naden4, Kylie Gwynne5

  1. Aboriginal Workforce Unit, Western NSW Local Health District, Dubbo, NSW, Australia
  2. Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  3. Western NSW Local Health District, Dubbo, NSW, Australia
  4. Bila Muuji Aboriginal Health Services, Dubbo, NSW, Australia
  5. Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Overview

The delivery of culturally responsive allied health services for Aboriginal people in small rural and remote communities in NSW is challenging. The workforce issues, geographical distance and historical absence of services has resulted in a lack of access to allied health services that meet the community needs. Access to allied health services is a key factor in improving health outcomes for rural populations which have been noted as poorer than their metropolitan counterparts.

The Allied Health Assistant (AHA) workforce has been emerging as a crucial way to spread the reach of limited Allied Health Professional (AHP) resources across Australia. Training and employing local Aboriginal people as AHA’s in remote NSW communities with a high proportion of Aboriginal people is one potential solution to increasing access to a more sustainable allied health service. In rural and remote NSW, Aboriginal AHAs have the potential to deliver culturally appropriate services, understand community contexts and to connect to the community. However, recruiting to these positions, providing adequate training, supervision and meaningful support from AHPs as well as the complexities of working within your own community are potential challenges.

The Quinine Project has been established in partnership with Western NSW local health district, the NSW Ministry of Health, the Poche Centre for Indigenous health and the Faculty of Health sciences at the University of Sydney. This project employed five Aboriginal AHAs into newly created positions, providing services in remote north-west NSW communities for a two year period. The Quinine Project has been operating since November 2016 and we will outline the processes of establishing, on-boarding, supporting and embedding these positions in local services. The training, supervision and support structures for the Aboriginal AHAs will be described and learnings to date shared. This presentation will provide practical information to others considering establishing Aboriginal AHA positions. The issues identified and successful processes will be highlighted from the different perspectives of the project partners, providing a comprehensive overview of the project establishment and progress.

Presenters

Lesa Towers

Lesa Towers

Lesa is a proud Awabakal woman from the Newcastle area and moved to Western NSW 12 years ago. Lesa started her Health career as a Trainee Aboriginal Health Worker and is now an AHPRA Registered Aboriginal Health Practitioner that has progressed into leadership and management roles. Lesa currently manages a number of Aboriginal workforce development strategies for the district including the implementation of the School Based Aboriginal Trainee Program, the Trainee Aboriginal Health Worker Program and is currently co leading the implementation of the clinical support systems to employ Aboriginal Health Practitioner roles within the Western NSW Local Health District.


Professor Michelle Lincoln

Professor Michelle Lincoln is the Deputy Dean in the Faculty of Health Sciences. In this senior role, she is engaged in all aspects of the leadership of the Faculty. Michelle is focused on promoting the role and impact of allied health professionals on the lives of clients and patients and service delivery. Her second focus is on the preparation of the future allied health workforce. This is reflected in both her leadership of the Faculty and her research.

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Wednesday 29 November 2017 - 12.05pm - 12:30pm

CARE - The journey into Occupational Therapy educators delivering culturally safe curriculum – Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie & Meaghan Rice

Authors

Meaghan Rice & Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie The University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA

Overview

This presentation discusses the processes and key findings of an occupational therapy participatory community development project which sought to facilitate conversations around systemic racism and the need for cultural safety within the education of the occupational therapy workforce. In order to satisfy core occupational therapy values such as client-centredness, holism and strength-focussed care, it is essential that cultural safety is upheld by occupational therapists in order to work effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Occupational therapy programs around Australia are required by recent accreditation standards to equip the future workforce with the skills to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in a culturally safe manner. Many occupational therapy programs are subsequently working to strengthen this area of curriculum to address the current gap in cultural competency among graduate occupational therapists. Between June and August 2017, a participatory community project was conducted by the University of South Australia in partnership with Reconciliation South Australia. This project sought to build the capacity of occupational therapy educators to deliver cultural safety content within curriculum in order to improve the cultural capabilities of occupational therapy graduates. Through the use of cultural knowledges and community participation, this project developed a comprehensive understanding of the needs of educators and students to deliver and engage with content that seeks to develop cultural safety. Collaboration with a steering committee and working group encouraged input from key stakeholders and community members. The use of meaningful occupations, such as basket weaving and yarning activities facilitated the engagement of the university community in reflexive discussions about cultural safety. The findings of this project have the potential to contribute to the advancement of cultural safety education within occupational therapy, thus improving the care provided to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The project identifies the needs of the staff and student community, in addition to highlighting and summarising existing and required resources for occupational therapy educators, and the broader university. Furthermore, the findings present the potential for similar projects to be conducted within other universities and for collaboration within the allied health community for a multi-disciplinary approach to building the capacity of the future workforce to deliver culturally safe care.

Presenters

Meaghan Rice

Meaghan Rice

Meaghan Rice is final-year Masters of Occupational Therapy student at the University of South Australia and holds a Bachelor of Health Sciences from the University of Adelaide. Meaghan is interested in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing, particularly the role that community development can play in working towards equitable health care. Meaghan recently completed a ten-week community development placement at Reconciliation SA seeking to improve cultural safety within occupational therapy practice.


Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie

Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie

Trevor-Tirritpa Ritchie is a Kaurna man and an Occupational Therapist. He has previously worked in Corrections, Housing and Education. He is currently working at the University of South Australia as a Lecturer in Allied Health Aboriginal Health. He is also working as a Paediatric OT with Country Health SA providing services to remote communities on the far West South Australian Coast.

CULTURES - An interprofessional approach to care of adults with chronic conditions – Maddison Adams & Ashley Potgieter

Authors

Maddison Adams, Ashley Potgieter

Overview

Comprehensive care of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult population requires input from numerous health professionals. Traditionally, these services were accessed through contract arrangements with private providers and/or through the mainstream public health system. This tended to fragment care, no matter how great the individual health service provider was. In South-East Queensland, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community controlled health clinics have opted to regionalise allied health services through the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH). This has enabled provision of interprofessional services in a team to meet the complex care needs of adult clients with a chronic condition. In addition to the client’s primary care GP and health worker, clients also have access to Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists, Podiatrists, Dietitians and a care coordinator, who are working collectively to support each clients’ goals and to holistically address their health needs.

The aim of this presentation is to describe how interprofessional practice is delivered in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community controlled setting to promote optimal outcomes for clients. Tools for case coordination will be discussed, including shared case conferences, joint sessions and joint home visits to address clients’ needs. An interprofessional approach to exercise prescription and monitoring, oedema management and falls prevention will also be outlined, including how outcomes are achieved and monitored. Case studies will be used to demonstrate how working inter-professionally, allied health professionals are able to screen for other professions, allowing for more comprehensive care and ensure clients do not slip through the cracks in service delivery. Having an outcome-driven approach to care also assists with integrating the team into the broader primary health care plan and connecting clients with a one-stop shop.

Presenters

Maddison Adams

Maddison Adams

Maddison Adams is a proud Wulli Wulli woman from Brisbane. She completed her Bachelor of Health Science (Podiatry) at Queensland University of Technology in 2015. Maddison started working at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health (IUIH) after competing some of her clinical placement at IUIH in her final year. Maddison thoroughly enjoys working with community and within a multidisciplinary team. Maddison has shown commitment to Indigenous Health through engagement with Indigenous Allied Health Australia and events within her community. Maddison is committed to working collaboratively with community and other health care professionals to provide holistic and culturally responsive care.


Ashley Potgieter

Ashley Potgieter

Ashley Potgieter is an Occupational Therapist currently working at The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health. She graduated from the University of Queensland in 2013 as an Occupational Therapist (B.Occ Thy). After working in regional Queensland for a few years, Ashley started working with the Institute in 2017 and is committed to helping community to improve health outcomes. She values working in a multidisciplinary team with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and their families, as well as working with adults. Ashley is currently studying her Masters of Advanced Occupational Therapy as she is committed to learning and professional development to be able to deliver a high-quality service when working with her clients.

CONNECTION - ‘Yamanha – li Balit – Djak: We two go together, Stronger’. Navigating through the Health Independence Program (HIP) with an Aboriginal Lens Model of Care – Charmaine Bell & Kerrie Brown

Authors

Charmaine E.A Bell &  Kerrie L Browna
Allied Health, Albury Wodonga Health, Albury Wodonga, NSW, Vic, Australia

Aim

Through an Aboriginal lens you can improve the health outcomes of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people by providing a culturally safe, collaborative and interdisciplinary sustainable model of care with in the Health Independence Program – HIP.

Content

This presentation will give a brief historical background of the ‘Client Journey’ program within the HUME Region.

Following this, an overview on how the evaluation of the ‘Client Journey’ informed Albury Wodonga Health - AWH in moving forward to support

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people with referral pathways to the HIP and work towards a culturally safe setting.

Learning Objectives

  • To be able to discuss the significance of having an Aboriginal lens model of care within the HIP.
  • To be able to explore the systematic changes needed to support a culturally safe setting.
  • To be able to identify the indicators of why Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people decline and/or disengage services within the HIP.
  • To be able to develop a model of care specific to meeting the needs of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people within the HIP.

Presenters

Kerrie Brown

Kerrie Brown

Kerrie Brown is a proud Gunditjmara woman now living in Wodonga, Victoria. She has worked in Aboriginal Health for the past 15 years, starting as an Aboriginal Maternity Liaison Officer and moving into service development in the last two years. Kerrie’s core business is developing, leading and supporting service development that meets the Improving Care for Aboriginal Patients program within the hospital setting and assisting with staff cultural training


Charmaine Bell

Charmaine Bell

Charmaine Bell is a proud Woddi Woddi Salt-water Woman from the South Coast of NSW. Charmaine’s country stretches along La Perouse to Wreck Bay. Family, kinship, culture and identity has always kept Charmaine grounded. Today, Charmaine stands proud and tall as she expresses her gratitude to her greatest heroes: her dearest elders both past and present and in particular her Nan. Charmaine believes that her elders have paved a path for her to continue to keep Aboriginal culture alive and strong.

To date, Charmaine is a qualified Aboriginal Health Practitioner and is near completion of her Bachelor Health Science: Mental Health. She has just applied to study the Masters of Social Work at Charles Sturt University. For the past 4 ½ years, Charmaine has worked as an Aboriginal Health Transition Officer in the Client Journey Program at Albury Wodonga Health. Charmaine is passionate about Aboriginal Health being everyone’s business and improving the health outcomes for her community and is a strong advocate for her mob.

COLLABORATION - Bush Medicine Program in the Kimberley Region - Joanna Martin & Louise McKenna

Overview

Balgo (Wirrimanu) is one of Australian’s most remote Aboriginal communities located in the south-east Kimberley region of Western Australia on the northern edge of the Great Sandy Desert and on the western edge of the Tanami Desert. The Community is approximately 1100km east of Broome and 250km south of Halls Creek with a population of approximately 500 – 600 people.  The Balgo Bush Medicines program is a community driven initiative to promote the use of traditional bush medicines in the community.  Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services provides bush medicines to the Balgo community through the Balgo Health Centre.

Presenters

Joanna Martin and Jamilah Bin Omar

Joanna Martin and Jamilah Bin Omar

Joanna Martin and Jamilah Bin Omar Jamilah and Joanna work together to form the KAMS Pharmacy Support Team. Jamilah is an Aboriginal Health Practitioner and is also the KAMS enior Aboriginal Medication Support Officer. Joanna is the KAMS Pharmacist. The KAMS Pharmacy Support Team is based in Broome but travels throughout the Kimberley to each Aboriginal Health Service and Renal  Health Centre. Joanna and Jamilah provide education, clinical support and training to staff and patients throughout the Kimberley.


Louise McKenna

Bio Coming Soon

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