Workshops

DAY ONE

Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 1.30pm – 3pm

CARE - Leadership Lens Check-Up - Presented by Duane Vickery

Description:

The subtle art of leading with purpose and intent in a culturally responsive manner” This workshop will examine the key elements essential for leading in a culturally responsive manner.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Explore key qualities and characteristics of successful leaders
  • Understand the connection between leadership and cultural responsiveness
  • Focusing and sharpening your leadership lens

Presenter

Duane Vickery

Duane Vickery

Duane Vickery is a highly respected and sought after Indigenous and South Sea Islander educator, coach, facilitator, trainer and mentor in the field of leadership, community engagement and community/corporate governance. Duane has worked in the public and private sectors for over twenty years and has developed an excellent reputation for his passion, commitment and desire to see others excel and reach their full potential by working alongside others to build their capacity through a ‘strengths-based’ approach.

Duane is a graduate of the Australian Rural Leadership Program (ARLP Course 10, 2004) and effectively utilises his well-established leadership skills and networks to assist in the development of others. He successfully completed the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD) course in 2003 and is a certified Cross Cultural Facilitator.

Duane is currently Managing Director of Education Training & Management Perspectives Pty Ltd (ETMP), a consultancy company specialising in leadership development and governance facilitation, education, training and research. He is an adjunct lecturer in Multicultural Studies at Avondale College, NSW and is a former Director of Worawa Aboriginal College in Victoria.

Duane graduated from Avondale College with a Diploma of Teaching (1991) and Bachelor of Education (1993), before going on to complete a Masters in Professional Studies (Aboriginal Education) from the University of New England (1996). Duane successfully completed the Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership and a Certificate IV Business (Governance) with the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC). In May 2013 Duane was awarded the Roberta Sykes Indigenous Education Foundation bursary to study at the Harvard University, Boston USA, where he successfully completed the executive education program ‘The Art and Practice of Leadership Development’.

CULTURES - Cultural Determinants of Health – Presented by Dr Raymond Lovett

Overview

This 1.5 hour workshop aims to explore Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural determinants for improved wellbeing. This workshop will consist of small group work (up to 10 people in each group) where participants will  discuss what cultural elements are important to them as an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person. This  will then contribute to the broader national agenda on refining a national survey on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and wellbeing (The Mayi Kuwayu Study: mkstudy.com.au).

Learning Outcomes

At the completion on the workshop, participants will have an:

  • increased understanding of cultural determinant of wellbeing.
  • greater understanding of individual and community variation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture across the country.
  • increased understanding of how cultural determinant may impact of  the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Presenter

Dr Ray Lovett

Dr Ray Lovett

Associate Professor Ray Lovett is an NHMRC Fellow with the Epidemiology for Policy and Practice group at the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University. He also holds an adjunct Fellowship at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) in the Indigenous Social and Cultural Wellbeing group. Dr Lovett is an Aboriginal (Wongaibon) epidemiologist with extensive experience in health services research, large-scale data analysis for public health policy development and evaluation.

 

 

CONNECTION - A practical guide to the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet web resource: sharing evidence to support allied health care for diabetes and diabetic retinopathy – Presented by Edith Cowan University, Neil Drew, & Samantha Burrows

Workshop aim:

This 1.5 hour workshop will demonstrate the range of information, resources and knowledge exchange features available on the Australian HealthInfoNet (HealthInfoNet) web resource. The workshop will demonstrate how the HealthInfoNet web resource can support the practice of busy allied health professionals caring for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It will have a specific focus on diabetes and diabetic retinopathy and will provide an opportunity for participants to gain hands on experience through a number of short computer-based activities that explore the web resource.

Learning outcomes:

At the completion of the workshop, participants will have:

  • greater awareness of the extensive collection of information and resources available on the HealthInfoNet web resource to support allied health practice
  • knowledge of where and how to find the latest evidence about diabetes and diabetic retinopathy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • knowledge of the new multimedia resources that have been collaboratively developed by the HealthInfoNet and The Fred Hollows Foundation to support the delivery of eye care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with diabetic retinopathy
  • enhanced skills to efficiently use the HealthInfoNet web resource to access information and resources
  • confidence to efficiently use the HealthInfoNet’s knowledge exchange features to share information and experience with other allied health professionals working across the country.

Participants are encouraged to bring a tablet or laptop to use in the workshop. A limited number of iPads can be provided if requested beforehand (please contact Sam Burrow on s.burrow@ecu.edu.au  by Monday, 6 November).

Presenters:

Sam Burrows

Sam Burrow

Sam Burrow is a Research Officer with the HealthInfoNet. Sam has worked in various research roles for 20 years and has been involved in research in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and education sectors for 15 of those. She co-wrote the HealthInfoNet’s Review of diabetes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2016. Sam currently works collaboratively with David Aanundsen, from The Fred Hollows Foundation’s Indigenous Australia Program, to develop various knowledge exchange products for the HealthInfoNet's Eye health web resource.
Neil Drew

Neil Drew

Neil Drew is Director of the Australia Indigenous HealthInfoNet; an internet resource that informs practice and policy in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by making research and other knowledge readily accessible. Neil has postgraduate qualifications in social psychology and over 30 years’ experience working with a diverse range of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and groups. He was psychologist for the Department of Family Services in Queensland working with young offenders and the victims of child sexual abuse. Prior to joining the HealthInfoNet Neil held positions at the University of Notre Dame Australia including Foundation Head of Behavioural Science, Dean of Arts and Sciences and Deputy Head of the University Broome Campus of Reconciliation. From 2002-2005 he was Director of the University of Western Australia Institute for Regional Development. He was program coordinator of the Wundargoodie Aboriginal Youth and Community Wellbeing Program in the East Kimberley established in 2006. The program promotes wellness and suicide prevention with young people in East Kimberley Aboriginal communities. He is co-author of chapters in the text, Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Mental Health Wellbeing Principles and Practice (2010/14) and co-author of the text Social Psychology and Everyday Life (2010).
YARNING - Making self-determination real - Presented by Assoc. Prof Gregory Phillips

Overview:

This interactive session will feature a small presentation on self-determination, identify the realities of self-determination and power relations in your work/life, and workshop real life solutions. You bring your story, together we answer the questions.

Presenter:

Gregory Phillips

Assoc Professor Gregory Phillips

Gregory Phillips is from the Waanyi and Jaru Aboriginal Australian peoples, and comes from Cloncurry and Mount Isa.

He is a medical anthropologist, has a PhD in psychology (‘Dancing With Power: Aboriginal Health, Cultural Safety and Medical Education’), a research master’s degree in medical science (‘Addictions and Healing in Aboriginal Country’; published as a book in 2003), and a bachelor degree in arts (Aboriginal Studies and Government majors).

Gregory has twenty years work experience in healing, alcohol and other drugs, youth empowerment, medical education and health workforce. He developed an accredited Indigenous health curriculum for all medical schools in Australia and New Zealand, founded the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network, and co-wrote a national Indigenous health workforce strategy. He established the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing Foundation Ltd in the wake of the federal apology to Indigenous Australians, has advised federal ministers on Indigenous health inequality, and was honoured in 2011 with an ADC Australian Leadership Forum Award.

Gregory is currently Chief Executive Officer of ABSTARR Consulting, and an Associate Professor and Research Fellow at The Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute.

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Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 3.30pm – 5pm

CARE - Mentoring: Our Future in Our Hands – Presented by Duane Vickery

Description:

If mentoring others is such a rewarding calling, why doesn’t everyone do it?“ This workshop will examine the characteristics of the ineffective and effective mentor.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Explore what mentoring is and how it can benefit you (professionally and personally)
  • Explore definitions of and approaches to mentoring
  • Engage in peer mentoring to practice new skills and knowledge gained in a culturally safe environment
  • Understand culturally responsiveness capability and its connection to successful mentoring

Presenter:

Duane Vickery

Duane Vickery

Duane Vickery is a highly respected and sought after Indigenous and South Sea Islander educator, coach, facilitator, trainer and mentor in the field of leadership, community engagement and community/corporate governance. Duane has worked in the public and private sectors for over twenty years and has developed an excellent reputation for his passion, commitment and desire to see others excel and reach their full potential by working alongside others to build their capacity through a ‘strengths-based’ approach.

Duane is a graduate of the Australian Rural Leadership Program (ARLP Course 10, 2004) and effectively utilises his well-established leadership skills and networks to assist in the development of others. He successfully completed the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD) course in 2003 and is a certified Cross Cultural Facilitator.

Duane is currently Managing Director of Education Training & Management Perspectives Pty Ltd (ETMP), a consultancy company specialising in leadership development and governance facilitation, education, training and research. He is an adjunct lecturer in Multicultural Studies at Avondale College, NSW and is a former Director of Worawa Aboriginal College in Victoria.

Duane graduated from Avondale College with a Diploma of Teaching (1991) and Bachelor of Education (1993), before going on to complete a Masters in Professional Studies (Aboriginal Education) from the University of New England (1996). Duane successfully completed the Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership and a Certificate IV Business (Governance) with the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC). In May 2013 Duane was awarded the Roberta Sykes Indigenous Education Foundation bursary to study at the Harvard University, Boston USA, where he successfully completed the executive education program ‘The Art and Practice of Leadership Development’.

CULTURES - Panel Discussion - Culturally Safe & Responsive Care - Panel Members: Assoc. Prof. Gregory Phillips, Assoc. Prof Keawe’aimoku, Kaholokula, June Oscar AO

Panel Members:

Gregory Phillips

Assoc Professor Gregory Phillips

Gregory Phillips is from the Waanyi and Jaru Aboriginal Australian peoples, and comes from Cloncurry and Mount Isa.

He is a medical anthropologist, has a PhD in psychology (‘Dancing With Power: Aboriginal Health, Cultural Safety and Medical Education’), a research master’s degree in medical science (‘Addictions and Healing in Aboriginal Country’; published as a book in 2003), and a bachelor degree in arts (Aboriginal Studies and Government majors).

Gregory has twenty years work experience in healing, alcohol and other drugs, youth empowerment, medical education and health workforce. He developed an accredited Indigenous health curriculum for all medical schools in Australia and New Zealand, founded the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network, and co-wrote a national Indigenous health workforce strategy. He established the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing Foundation Ltd in the wake of the federal apology to Indigenous Australians, has advised federal ministers on Indigenous health inequality, and was honoured in 2011 with an ADC Australian Leadership Forum Award.

Gregory is currently Chief Executive Officer of ABSTARR Consulting, and an Associate Professor and Research Fellow at The Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute.
Joseph Keawe‘aimoku Kaholokula, PhD

Joseph Keawe‘aimoku Kaholokula, PhD

Dr. Keawe Kaholokula is a Professor and Chair of Native Hawaiian Health in the John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa.
His research involves developing community-based and culturally relevant health promotion programs to address diabetes and cardiovascular disease inequities in Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders using community-based participatory research approaches. His research also examines how biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural factors interplay to affect their risk for and management of chronic diseases. He serves on several community boards of organizations with a mission to improve Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander health and is co-Chair for the Native Hawaiian Health Task Force.
Dr. Keawe Kaholokula is a Professor and Chair of Native Hawaiian Health in the John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa.

His research involves developing community-based and culturally relevant health promotion programs to address diabetes and cardiovascular disease inequities in Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders using community-based participatory research approaches. His research also examines how biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural factors interplay to affect their risk for and management of chronic diseases.

He serves on several community boards of organizations with a mission to improve Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander health and is co-Chair for the Native Hawaiian Health Task Force.

He is also a member of Hale Mua o Kūali‘i, a Hawaiian cultural group dedicated to the revitalization of traditional values and practices.
June Oscar AO

June Oscar AO

June Oscar AO is a proud Bunuba woman from the remote town of Fitzroy Crossing in Western Australia’s Kimberly region. She is a strong advocate for Indigenous Australian languages, social justice, women’s issues, and has worked tirelessly to reduce Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

June has held a raft of influential positions including Deputy Director of the Kimberley Land Council, chair of the Kimberley Language Resource Centre and the Kimberley Interpreting Service and Chief Investigator with WA’s Lililwan Project addressing FASD.

She was appointed to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (1990) and was a winner of the 100 Women of Influence 2013 in the Social Enterprise and Not For Profit category. In 2015 June received the Menzies School of Health Research Medallion for her work with FASD.

June has a Bachelor’s Degree in Business from the University of Notre Dame, Broome, Western Australia, and is currently writing her Phd. June is a co-founder of the Yiramalay Wesley Studio School and is a Community member of the Fitzroy Valley Futures Governing Committee.

In February 2017, she was awarded an honorary doctorate from Edith Cowen University.

June began her five-year term as Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner on April 3, 2017.
CONNECTION - Dying to Talk – Helping people to talk about their wishes and preferences for their care at the end of life – Presented by Grace Keyworth & Rebecca Storen - Palliative Care Australia

Description

Having a conversation in advance can help reduce the stress at the time of a serious illness and assist the family in making decisions about their loved one’s care if the person was unable to tell people what they wanted. In partnership with the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM), Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association(AIDA) and Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), Palliative Care Australia (PCA) has developed a discussion starter and a deck of cards to help people work out what is right for them, which can also assist health professionals to gently introduce the conversation their practice. In this interactive workshop, we will talk about PCA’s dying to talk campaign and lead a session with the cards and discussion starter.

Learning outcomes

At the end of this session, participants should have:

  • An understanding of the resources available
  • A knowledge of how the resource could be used to help patients identify what care they might want at the end of their life
  • Help the workshop participants understand what they might want at the end of the life

Presenters

Grace Keyworth

Grace Keyworth

Grace has been the communications manager at Palliative Care Australia since early 2016. With a background in journalism and law, she is passionate about communication, health and the power of storytelling. She will tell us about PCA’s Dying to Talk campaign, and how two dinosaurs came to be the perfect tools to getting people to open up about their end of life care preferences.
Rebecca Storen

Rebecca Storen

Rebecca is a Program Coordinator for Palliative Care Australia, the peak body for palliative care. She received her Bachelor of Medical Science from Charles Sturt University before undertaking her Graduate Diploma in Genetic Counselling and Master of Public Health. After spending nearly a decade working as a scientist, first in diagnostics and then in research, Rebecca returned to Canberra, where she has worked in policy and projects in primary health, aged care and now in palliative care. When she isn’t working, Rebecca enjoys trying new recipes and traveling (and dreaming of places to travel).
YARNING - Rural and Remote Disability Workforce - Presented by Donna-Maree Towney & Robert Curry

Overview

Remote and Rural Indigenous Allied Health Workforce Development Project (RIAHP)

IAHA obtained funding through the Department of Social Services to look at what is needed to build allied health capacity in three communities: Tennant Creek (NT), Palm Island (Qld) and Narrabri in NSW.  There is little argument that increasing allied health services provided by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in remote and rural areas is an essential part of what’s needed.  How we can do that, what works, what doesn’t and what could we change and build on as our strengths of a sector and in our communities.

This Yarning session will create a dialogue on -the importance of allied health in the disability sector specifically in providing culturally safe and responsive services with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, families and communities. We would love to hear from the workforce what the key strengths and challenges are in ensuring our needs are addressed in improving health and wellbeing outcomes.

Topics may cover:

  • National Disability Insurance Scheme
  • Rural and Remote workforce models
  • Workforce support and development
  • Pathways into the workforce
  • Access to sustainable allied health services
  • Cultural responsiveness
  • Stakeholder engagement and relationships

Come and share your experiences and knowledge.

Presenters

Rob Curry

Rob Curry

Rob has spent much of his working life as a physiotherapist and health programs manager in the context of remote Aboriginal health care in the north of Australia.  His work and thinking have been influenced by the issues of aged and disability care, the international philosophy of Primary Health Care, and the Australian model of Aboriginal community controlled health service delivery.

For 10 years through the 1990s Rob provided outreach physiotherapy services visiting remote Aboriginal communities around the Top End of the Northern Territory.  From 2000 to 2003 he was a health promotions manager at the Tiwi Health Board north of Darwin.  From 2004 to 2013 he worked for the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance of the NT (AMSANT) where program management in the areas of workforce support, quality and accreditation, chronic disease prevention and public health policy development were his major responsibilities.

In 2013 Rob re-settled with his wife at Ellenborough on the Mid North Coast, NSW, where he has worked part-time as a health consultant with projects including health program evaluations and health policy formulation. He currently works as Operations Manager in support of the Mid North Coast Aboriginal Health Accord, a partnership between three Aboriginal health services, NSW health, and the North Coast Primary Health Network.

Rob was a founding member of Services for Australian Rural & Remote Allied Health (SARRAH) in 1995 and is currently the Chair at SARRAH.
Donna-Maree Towney

Donna-Maree Towney

Donna-Maree Towney is a Gunditjmarra woman, which is in the beautiful Gippsland region of Victoria.

Donna-Maree worked in the Australian Public Service (APS) for 15 years and proudly joined the IAHA team and is currently working on the Remote and rural Indigenous allied health workforce development project (RIAHP). She believes that this is a great opportunity to develop a sustainable allied health workforce that will help keep Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities strong and healthy.

Donna-Maree says this project has presented her with so many new and exciting opportunities that she could never have envisaged and her favourite part of the job is being able to travel to remote communities to meet amazing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and learn about other cultures.
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DAY TWO

Wednesday 29 November 2017 - 1.30pm – 3pm

CARE - Keeping a step ahead of ulceration and amputation – Presented by Matthew West, Vivienne Chuter & Fiona Hawke

Overview

In this workshop, Lowitja scholar and PhD candidate Matthew West and his academic supervisors Associate Professor Vivienne Chuter and Dr Fiona Hawke will lead a practical and interactive session on how to help our patients keep on their feet and live without fear of ulceration and amputation in diabetes. The session leaders will teach you about the different types of ulceration and how they can be prevented.  You will also be introduced to screening techniques used to assess a patient’s risk of ulceration. This will include an opportunity for you to use ultrasonic dopplers to assess lower limb blood flow and neurological screening tests to detect neuropathy. The leaders will provide practical advice on what to do if your patient presents with a new foot ulcer and will highlight to you some warnings signs of other complications. You will also be able to practice applying pressure reducing padding to the foot which is commonly used by podiatrists to reduce pressure to a wound, which is fundamental to healing.  This workshop aims to improve your knowledge of ulceration and amputation so that you can help reduce community fear about the perceived inevitability of amputation in diabetes. Together, we can enable patients to feel in control of their foot and leg health, and reduce amputation rates.

Aim

To improve knowledge of ulceration and amputation so that allied health professionals can help reduce community fear about the inevitability of amputation in diabetes and empower patients to feel in control of their foot and leg health.

Learning objectives

At the end of the workshop participants will be able to

  • Identify the different types of lower limb ulceration
  • Describe to patients basic principles of pathways to ulceration and amputation
  • Refer for screening for risk of ulceration and amputation when required
  • Describe to patients the types of screenings tests that may be done upon referral
  • Apply basic deflective dressing to the sole of the foot that can be used in an emergency before specialist care is available

Presenters

Matthew West

Matthew West

Mr Matthew West is a Wiradjuri man and PhD candidate currently living and working on the Central Coast of NSW.

Mr West holds concurrent positions as an Associate Lecturer and Clinical Educator at the University of Newcastle and works clinically as a podiatrist at his local Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS) Eleanor Duncan Medical Centre and is a Board Member of the Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council.
Associate Professor Vivienne Chuter

Associate Professor Vivienne Chuter

Associate Professor Vivienne Chuter is Head of Podiatry at the University of Newcastle and is principal academic supervisor of Matthew West's PhD research.
Dr Fiona Hawke

Dr Fiona Hawke

Dr Fiona Hawke is a Lecturer in Podiatry at the University of Newcastle.
CULTURES - Good Spirit, Good Life: Dementia and the Wellbeing of our Elders - Presented by Kate Smith & Lianne Gilchrist

Description

This interactive workshop will give you an overview of one of the most prevalent health conditions of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and how you can improve your practice in this field. Dementia has a major impact not only on the person with the condition, but also their family and community, and is a leading cause of residential care admissions (often off Country).

Learning objectives

At the end of the workshop the participants will be able to:
1. Identify the protective (and risk) factors for cognitive impairment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples across the lifespan.
2. Identify some of the factors important to the quality of life of older Aboriginal Australians.
3. Understand the steps required to develop an assessment tool that is valid for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
4. Administer and interpret the KICA appropriately.
5. Describe some top tips, useful strategies and activities for working with people with dementia.

Presenters

Dr Kate Smith

Dr Kate Smith

Dr Kate Smith is a Wadjella Occupational Therapist and Research Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Medical and Dental Health, University of WA. She has coordinated a number of Aboriginal ageing research studies in remote, rural and urban regions since 2003, including those on Aboriginal dementia assessment, prevalence, and protective/ risk factors; Aboriginal community care models; carer wellbeing and empowerment; and the development of quality of life package with older Aboriginal Australians. Her PhD work on the development of an Indigenous cognitive assessment tool (the KICA) has been replicated internationally.
Lianne Gilchrist

Lianne Gilchrist

Lianne Gilchrist is a Yamatji woman from the Ingarda language group in the North West of Australia. She is an Occupational Therapist, working as a Research Officer at the Centre for Aboriginal Medical and Dental Health (CAMDH) at the University of Western Australia (UWA), developing an overall package for service providers to assess and address the wellbeing needs of older Aboriginal people living in urban areas.
CONNECTION - Assessment Yarning – Proppa ways for assessing our kids – Presented by Tara Lewis

Overview

Assessing the developmental abilities of First Nations children has become a contentious issue over the years with some researchers advocating for non-standard forms of assessments and others the continued use of standardized assessments. Whilst there continues to be debate surrounding culturally responsive assessment practices, First Nations people through both my research and the 2017 NAIDOC Theme; ‘Our Languages Matter’ are stating that maintaining our way of communicating is important as it is the vehicle for our culture knowledge and identity. Therefore, we as allied health professionals need to acknowledge and adapt our assessment processes and practices to ensure they cater for First Nations people’s ways of communicating. This interactive 1.5hour workshop will provide participants with the knowledge and skills to use yarning as an assessment methodology to ensure we are truly connecting and understanding First Nations clients. This workshop is aimed at allied health professionals from varying disciplines as well as students and supervisory clinicians.

Learning objectives

By the end of the workshop, participants will have:

  • an understanding of Aboriginal English and it’s function
  • an understanding of yarning and its importance to First Nations peoples
  • the skills and knowledge to engage in yarning as an assessment methodology

Presenter

Tara Lewis

Tara Lewis

Tara is an Iman woman from Queensland. She grew up in Brisbane where she completed her Bachelor of Speech Pathology. Tara is the senior speech pathologist at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health where she supports other allied health practioners in providing culturally responsive services. Tara is also a PhD candidate at the University of QLD where she is privileging Indigenous voices to understand the values and aspirations First Nations people have surround communication. Tara has also developed a culturally responsive methodology for assessing First Nations children; assessment yarning and has developed a communication assessment called Gumerri that utilises cultural stories and follows and values Aboriginal ways of communicating.

COLLABORATION - Closing the Gap Refresh - Presented by Sam Jeffries

Workshop aim

The workshop aims to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are meaningfully engaged in the Closing the Gap Refresh process.

Learning outcomes

At the completion of the workshop, participants will have:

  • Greater awareness of the Closing the Gap Refresh process
  • Knowledge of what is needed to support Indigenous community leadership and decision- making
  • Knowledge of how governments, communities, organisations, businesses and other stakeholders can work more effectively together
  • Greater awareness of what is needed to change the relationship between governments and communities
  • An understanding of what resources, including data, are needed to help communities drive local action

Presenter

Sam Jeffries

Sam Jeffries

Sam Jeffries is a proud Mooraworri/Wiradjuri man. Born and raised in Brewarrina NSW.

He has spent practically all his life in north western NSW, having long term involvement in the development of responsible leadership, community development, and developing regional and community governance models. He has co-authored two Indigenous policy journals on Indigenous Community Governance and Leadership, published by Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning, University of Technology Sydney, written papers on national representation, and written and presented many speeches on public policy matters relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Sam led Aboriginal regional governance structures in Western NSW for two decades. Murdi Paaki (muddy parky) Regional Council (ATSIC) and Murdi Paaki (muddy parky) Regional Assembly MPRA (post ATSIC), were and have been at the forefront for collaborative arrangements between Aboriginal Peoples and Australian and NSW Governments around the delivery of services and programs.

Sam was part of the federal governments Expert Panel on Constitutional Recognition for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People 2011-12

This work has led Sam into his current position in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet as the Special Adviser for Regional Governance Indigenous Affairs.

DAY ONE

Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 1.30pm – 3pm

CARE - Leadership Lens Check-Up - Presented by Duane Vickery

Description:

The subtle art of leading with purpose and intent in a culturally responsive manner” This workshop will examine the key elements essential for leading in a culturally responsive manner.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Explore key qualities and characteristics of successful leaders
  • Understand the connection between leadership and cultural responsiveness
  • Focusing and sharpening your leadership lens

Presenter:

Duane Vickery

Duane Vickery

Duane Vickery is a highly respected and sought after Indigenous and South Sea Islander educator, coach, facilitator, trainer and mentor in the field of leadership, community engagement and community/corporate governance. Duane has worked in the public and private sectors for over twenty years and has developed an excellent reputation for his passion, commitment and desire to see others excel and reach their full potential by working alongside others to build their capacity through a ‘strengths-based’ approach.

Duane is a graduate of the Australian Rural Leadership Program (ARLP Course 10, 2004) and effectively utilises his well-established leadership skills and networks to assist in the development of others. He successfully completed the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD) course in 2003 and is a certified Cross Cultural Facilitator.

Duane is currently Managing Director of Education Training & Management Perspectives Pty Ltd (ETMP), a consultancy company specialising in leadership development and governance facilitation, education, training and research. He is an adjunct lecturer in Multicultural Studies at Avondale College, NSW and is a former Director of Worawa Aboriginal College in Victoria.

Duane graduated from Avondale College with a Diploma of Teaching (1991) and Bachelor of Education (1993), before going on to complete a Masters in Professional Studies (Aboriginal Education) from the University of New England (1996). Duane successfully completed the Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership and a Certificate IV Business (Governance) with the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC). In May 2013 Duane was awarded the Roberta Sykes Indigenous Education Foundation bursary to study at the Harvard University, Boston USA, where he successfully completed the executive education program ‘The Art and Practice of Leadership Development’.

CULTURES - Cultural Determinants of Health – Presented by Dr Raymond Lovett

Overview

This 1.5 hour workshop aims to explore Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural determinants for improved wellbeing. This workshop will consist of small group work (up to 10 people in each group) where participants will  discuss what cultural elements are important to them as an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person. This  will then contribute to the broader national agenda on refining a national survey on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and wellbeing (The Mayi Kuwayu Study: mkstudy.com.au).

Learning Outcomes

At the completion on the workshop, participants will have an:

  • increased understanding of cultural determinant of wellbeing.
  • greater understanding of individual and community variation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture across the country.
  • increased understanding of how cultural determinant may impact of  the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Presenter

Dr Ray Lovett

Dr Ray Lovett

Associate Professor Ray Lovett is an NHMRC Fellow with the Epidemiology for Policy and Practice group at the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University. He also holds an adjunct Fellowship at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) in the Indigenous Social and Cultural Wellbeing group. Dr Lovett is an Aboriginal (Wongaibon) epidemiologist with extensive experience in health services research, large-scale data analysis for public health policy development and evaluation.

 

 

CONNECTION - A practical guide to the Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet web resource: sharing evidence to support allied health care for diabetes and diabetic retinopathy – Presented by Edith Cowan University, Neil Drew, & Samantha Burrows

Workshop aim:

This 1.5 hour workshop will demonstrate the range of information, resources and knowledge exchange features available on the Australian HealthInfoNet (HealthInfoNet) web resource. The workshop will demonstrate how the HealthInfoNet web resource can support the practice of busy allied health professionals caring for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It will have a specific focus on diabetes and diabetic retinopathy and will provide an opportunity for participants to gain hands on experience through a number of short computer-based activities that explore the web resource.

Learning outcomes:

At the completion of the workshop, participants will have:

  • greater awareness of the extensive collection of information and resources available on the HealthInfoNet web resource to support allied health practice
  • knowledge of where and how to find the latest evidence about diabetes and diabetic retinopathy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • knowledge of the new multimedia resources that have been collaboratively developed by the HealthInfoNet and The Fred Hollows Foundation to support the delivery of eye care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with diabetic retinopathy
  • enhanced skills to efficiently use the HealthInfoNet web resource to access information and resources
  • confidence to efficiently use the HealthInfoNet’s knowledge exchange features to share information and experience with other allied health professionals working across the country.

Participants are encouraged to bring a tablet or laptop to use in the workshop. A limited number of iPads can be provided if requested beforehand (please contact Sam Burrow on s.burrow@ecu.edu.au  by Monday, 6 November).

 

Presenters:

Sam Burrow

Sam Burrow

Sam Burrow is a Research Officer with the HealthInfoNet. Sam has worked in various research roles for 20 years and has been involved in research in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and education sectors for 15 of those. She co-wrote the HealthInfoNet’s Review of diabetes among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in 2016. Sam currently works collaboratively with David Aanundsen, from The Fred Hollows Foundation’s Indigenous Australia Program, to develop various knowledge exchange products for the HealthInfoNet’s Eye health web resource.


Neil Drew

Neil Drew

Neil Drew is Director of the Australia Indigenous HealthInfoNet; an internet resource that informs practice and policy in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health by making research and other knowledge readily accessible. Neil has postgraduate qualifications in social psychology and over 30 years’ experience working with a diverse range of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and groups. He was psychologist for the Department of Family Services in Queensland working with young offenders and the victims of child sexual abuse. Prior to joining the HealthInfoNet Neil held positions at the University of Notre Dame Australia including Foundation Head of Behavioural Science, Dean of Arts and Sciences and Deputy Head of the University Broome Campus of Reconciliation. From 2002-2005 he was Director of the University of Western Australia Institute for Regional Development. He was program coordinator of the Wundargoodie Aboriginal Youth and Community Wellbeing Program in the East Kimberley established in 2006. The program promotes wellness and suicide prevention with young people in East Kimberley Aboriginal communities. He is co-author of chapters in the text, Working Together: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Mental Health Wellbeing Principles and Practice (2010/14) and co-author of the text Social Psychology and Everyday Life (2010).

YARNING - Making self-determination real - Presented by Assoc. Prof Gregory Phillips

Overview:

This interactive session will feature a small presentation on self-determination, identify the realities of self-determination and power relations in your work/life, and workshop real life solutions. You bring your story, together we answer the questions.

Presenter:

 

Assoc Professor Greg Phillips

Assoc Professor Greg Phillips

Gregory Phillips is from the Waanyi and Jaru Aboriginal Australian peoples, and comes from Cloncurry and Mount Isa.

He is a medical anthropologist, has a PhD in psychology (‘Dancing With Power: Aboriginal Health, Cultural Safety and Medical Education’), a research master’s degree in medical science (‘Addictions and Healing in Aboriginal Country’; published as a book in 2003), and a bachelor degree in arts (Aboriginal Studies and Government majors).

Gregory has twenty years work experience in healing, alcohol and other drugs, youth empowerment, medical education and health workforce. He developed an accredited Indigenous health curriculum for all medical schools in Australia and New Zealand, founded the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network, and co-wrote a national Indigenous health workforce strategy. He established the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing Foundation Ltd in the wake of the federal apology to Indigenous Australians, has advised federal ministers on Indigenous health inequality, and was honoured in 2011 with an ADC Australian Leadership Forum Award.

Gregory is currently Chief Executive Officer of ABSTARR Consulting, and an Associate Professor and Research Fellow at The Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute.

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Tuesday 28 November 2017 - 3.30pm – 5pm

CARE - Mentoring: Our Future in Our Hands – Presented by Duane Vickery

Description:

If mentoring others is such a rewarding calling, why doesn’t everyone do it?“ This workshop will examine the characteristics of the ineffective and effective mentor.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Explore what mentoring is and how it can benefit you (professionally and personally)
  • Explore definitions of and approaches to mentoring
  • Engage in peer mentoring to practice new skills and knowledge gained in a culturally safe environment
  • Understand culturally responsiveness capability and its connection to successful mentoring

 

Presenter:

Duane Vickery

Duane Vickery

Duane Vickery is a highly respected and sought after Indigenous and South Sea Islander educator, coach, facilitator, trainer and mentor in the field of leadership, community engagement and community/corporate governance. Duane has worked in the public and private sectors for over twenty years and has developed an excellent reputation for his passion, commitment and desire to see others excel and reach their full potential by working alongside others to build their capacity through a ‘strengths-based’ approach.

Duane is a graduate of the Australian Rural Leadership Program (ARLP Course 10, 2004) and effectively utilises his well-established leadership skills and networks to assist in the development of others. He successfully completed the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD) course in 2003 and is a certified Cross Cultural Facilitator.

Duane is currently Managing Director of Education Training & Management Perspectives Pty Ltd (ETMP), a consultancy company specialising in leadership development and governance facilitation, education, training and research. He is an adjunct lecturer in Multicultural Studies at Avondale College, NSW and is a former Director of Worawa Aboriginal College in Victoria.

Duane graduated from Avondale College with a Diploma of Teaching (1991) and Bachelor of Education (1993), before going on to complete a Masters in Professional Studies (Aboriginal Education) from the University of New England (1996). Duane successfully completed the Certificate IV in Indigenous Leadership and a Certificate IV Business (Governance) with the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre (AILC). In May 2013 Duane was awarded the Roberta Sykes Indigenous Education Foundation bursary to study at the Harvard University, Boston USA, where he successfully completed the executive education program ‘The Art and Practice of Leadership Development’.

CULTURES - Panel Discussion - Culturally Safe & Responsive Care - Panel Members: Assoc. Prof. Gregory Phillips, Assoc. Prof Keawe’aimoku, Kaholokula, June Oscar AO

Panel Members:

Gregory Phillips

Assoc Professor Gregory Phillips

Gregory Phillips is from the Waanyi and Jaru Aboriginal Australian peoples, and comes from Cloncurry and Mount Isa.

He is a medical anthropologist, has a PhD in psychology (‘Dancing With Power: Aboriginal Health, Cultural Safety and Medical Education’), a research master’s degree in medical science (‘Addictions and Healing in Aboriginal Country’; published as a book in 2003), and a bachelor degree in arts (Aboriginal Studies and Government majors).

Gregory has twenty years work experience in healing, alcohol and other drugs, youth empowerment, medical education and health workforce. He developed an accredited Indigenous health curriculum for all medical schools in Australia and New Zealand, founded the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network, and co-wrote a national Indigenous health workforce strategy. He established the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing Foundation Ltd in the wake of the federal apology to Indigenous Australians, has advised federal ministers on Indigenous health inequality, and was honoured in 2011 with an ADC Australian Leadership Forum Award.

Gregory is currently Chief Executive Officer of ABSTARR Consulting, and an Associate Professor and Research Fellow at The Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute.


Joseph Keawe‘aimoku Kaholokula, PhD

Joseph Keawe‘aimoku Kaholokula, PhD

Dr. Keawe Kaholokula is a Professor and Chair of Native Hawaiian Health in the John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa.

His research involves developing community-based and culturally relevant health promotion programs to address diabetes and cardiovascular disease inequities in Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders using community-based participatory research approaches. His research also examines how biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural factors interplay to affect their risk for and management of chronic diseases. He serves on several community boards of organizations with a mission to improve Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander health and is co-Chair for the Native Hawaiian Health Task Force.

He is also a member of Hale Mua o Kūali‘i, a Hawaiian cultural group dedicated to the revitalization of traditional values and practices.


June Oscar AO

June Oscar AO

June Oscar AO is a proud Bunuba woman from the remote town of Fitzroy Crossing in Western Australia’s Kimberly region. She is a strong advocate for Indigenous Australian languages, social justice, women’s issues, and has worked tirelessly to reduce Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD).

June has held a raft of influential positions including Deputy Director of the Kimberley Land Council, chair of the Kimberley Language Resource Centre and the Kimberley Interpreting Service and Chief Investigator with WA’s Lililwan Project addressing FASD .

She was appointed to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (1990) and was a winner of the 100 Women of Influence 2013 in the Social Enterprise and Not For Profit category. In 2015 June received the Menzies School of Health Research Medallion for her work with FASD.

June has a Bachelor’s Degree in Business from the University of Notre Dame, Broome, Western Australia, and is currently writing her Phd. June is a co-founder of the Yiramalay Wesley Studio School and is a Community member of the Fitzroy Valley Futures Governing Committee.

In February 2017, she was awarded an honorary doctorate from Edith Cowen University.

June began her five-year term as Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner on April 3, 2017.

CONNECTION - Dying to Talk – Helping people to talk about their wishes and preferences for their care at the end of life – Presented by Grace Keyworth & Rebecca Storen - Palliative Care Australia

Description

Having a conversation in advance can help reduce the stress at the time of a serious illness and assist the family in making decisions about their loved one’s care if the person was unable to tell people what they wanted. In partnership with the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM), Australian Indigenous Doctors’ Association(AIDA) and Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA), Palliative Care Australia (PCA) has developed a discussion starter and a deck of cards to help people work out what is right for them, which can also assist health professionals to gently introduce the conversation their practice. In this interactive workshop, we will talk about PCA’s dying to talk campaign and lead a session with the cards and discussion starter.

Learning outcomes

At the end of this session, participants should have:

  • An understanding of the resources available
  • A knowledge of how the resource could be used to help patients identify what care they might want at the end of their life
  • Help the workshop participants understand what they might want at the end of the life

Presenters

Grace Keyworth

Grace Keyworth

 

Grace has been the communications manager at Palliative Care Australia since early 2016. With a background in journalism and law, she is passionate about communication, health and the power of storytelling. She will tell us about PCA’s Dying to Talk campaign, and how two dinosaurs came to be the perfect tools to getting people to open up about their end of life care preferences.


Rebecca Storen

Rebecca Storen

 

Rebecca is a Program Coordinator for Palliative Care Australia, the peak body for palliative care. She received her Bachelor of Medical Science from Charles Sturt University before undertaking her Graduate Diploma in Genetic Counselling and Master of Public Health. After spending nearly a decade working as a scientist, first in diagnostics and then in research, Rebecca returned to Canberra, where she has worked in policy and projects in primary health, aged care and now in palliative care. When she isn’t working, Rebecca enjoys trying new recipes and traveling (and dreaming of places to travel).

YARNING - Rural and Remote Disability Workforce - Presented by Donna-Maree Towney & Robert Curry

Overview

Remote and Rural Indigenous Allied Health Workforce Development Project (RIAHP)

IAHA obtained funding through the Department of Social Services to look at what is needed to build allied health capacity in three communities: Tennant Creek (NT), Palm Island (Qld) and Narrabri in NSW.  There is little argument that increasing allied health services provided by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in remote and rural areas is an essential part of what’s needed.  How we can do that, what works, what doesn’t and what could we change and build on as our strengths of a sector and in our communities.

This Yarning session will create a dialogue on -the importance of allied health in the disability sector specifically in providing culturally safe and responsive services with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, families and communities. We would love to hear from the workforce what the key strengths and challenges are in ensuring our needs are addressed in improving health and wellbeing outcomes.

Topics may cover:

  • National Disability Insurance Scheme
  • Rural and Remote workforce models
  • Workforce support and development
  • Pathways into the workforce
  • Access to sustainable allied health services
  • Cultural responsiveness
  • Stakeholder engagement and relationships

Come and share your experiences and knowledge.

Presenters

Rob Curry

Rob Curry

BSc – Physiotherapy (Lincoln Institute, Vic), Grad Dip Aboriginal Studies (SACAE), MSc Primary Health Care (Flinders University)

Rob has spent much of his working life as a physiotherapist and health programs manager in the context of remote Aboriginal health care in the north of Australia.  His work and thinking have been influenced by the issues of aged and disability care, the international philosophy of Primary Health Care, and the Australian model of Aboriginal community controlled health service delivery.

For 10 years through the 1990s Rob provided outreach physiotherapy services visiting remote Aboriginal communities around the Top End of the Northern Territory.  From 2000 to 2003 he was a health promotions manager at the Tiwi Health Board north of Darwin.  From 2004 to 2013 he worked for the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance of the NT (AMSANT) where program management in the areas of workforce support, quality and accreditation, chronic disease prevention and public health policy development were his major responsibilities.

In 2013 Rob re-settled with his wife at Ellenborough on the Mid North Coast, NSW, where he has worked part-time as a health consultant with projects including health program evaluations and health policy formulation. He currently works as Operations Manager in support of the Mid North Coast Aboriginal Health Accord, a partnership between three Aboriginal health services, NSW health, and the North Coast Primary Health Network.

Rob was a founding member of Services for Australian Rural & Remote Allied Health (SARRAH) in 1995 and is currently the Chair at SARRAH.


Donna-Maree Towney

Donna-Maree Towney

Donna-Maree Towney is a Gunditjmarra woman, which is in the beautiful Gippsland region of Victoria.

Donna-Maree worked in the Australian Public Service (APS) for 15 years and proudly joined the IAHA team and is currently working on the Remote and rural Indigenous allied health workforce development project (RIAHP). She believes that this is a great opportunity to develop a sustainable allied health workforce that will help keep Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities strong and healthy.

Donna-Maree says this project has presented her with so many new and exciting opportunities that she could never have envisaged and her favourite part of the job is being able to travel to remote communities to meet amazing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and learn about other cultures.

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DAY TWO

Wednesday 29 November 2017 - 1.30pm – 3pm

CARE - Keeping a step ahead of ulceration and amputation – Presented by Matthew West, Vivienne Chuter & Fiona Hawke

Overview

In this workshop, Lowitja scholar and PhD candidate Matthew West and his academic supervisors Associate Professor Vivienne Chuter and Dr Fiona Hawke will lead a practical and interactive session on how to help our patients keep on their feet and live without fear of ulceration and amputation in diabetes. The session leaders will teach you about the different types of ulceration and how they can be prevented.  You will also be introduced to screening techniques used to assess a patient’s risk of ulceration. This will include an opportunity for you to use ultrasonic dopplers to assess lower limb blood flow and neurological screening tests to detect neuropathy. The leaders will provide practical advice on what to do if your patient presents with a new foot ulcer and will highlight to you some warnings signs of other complications. You will also be able to practice applying pressure reducing padding to the foot which is commonly used by podiatrists to reduce pressure to a wound, which is fundamental to healing.  This workshop aims to improve your knowledge of ulceration and amputation so that you can help reduce community fear about the perceived inevitability of amputation in diabetes. Together, we can enable patients to feel in control of their foot and leg health, and reduce amputation rates.

Aim

To improve knowledge of ulceration and amputation so that allied health professionals can help reduce community fear about the inevitability of amputation in diabetes and empower patients to feel in control of their foot and leg health.

Learning objectives

At the end of the workshop participants will be able to

  • Identify the different types of lower limb ulceration
  • Describe to patients basic principles of pathways to ulceration and amputation
  • Refer for screening for risk of ulceration and amputation when required
  • Describe to patients the types of screenings tests that may be done upon referral
  • Apply basic deflective dressing to the sole of the foot that can be used in an emergency before specialist care is available

Presenters

Matthew West

Matthew West

Mr Matthew West is a Wiradjuri man and PhD candidate currently living and working on the Central Coast of NSW.

Mr West holds concurrent positions as an Associate Lecturer and Clinical Educator at the University of Newcastle and works clinically as a podiatrist at his local Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS) Eleanor Duncan Medical Centre and is a Board Member of the Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council.


Associate Professor Vivienne Chuter

Associate Professor Vivienne Chuter

Associate Professor Vivienne Chuter is Head of Podiatry at the University of Newcastle and is principal academic supervisor of Matthew West’s PhD research.


Dr Fiona Hawke

Dr Fiona Hawke

Dr Fiona Hawke is a Lecturer in Podiatry at the University of Newcastle.

CULTURES - Good Spirit, Good Life: Dementia and the Wellbeing of our Elders - Presented by Kate Smith & Lianne Gilchrist

Description

This interactive workshop will give you an overview of one of the most prevalent health conditions of older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and how you can improve your practice in this field. Dementia has a major impact not only on the person with the condition, but also their family and community, and is a leading cause of residential care admissions (often off Country).

Learning objectives

At the end of the workshop the participants will be able to:
1. Identify the protective (and risk) factors for cognitive impairment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples across the lifespan.
2. Identify some of the factors important to the quality of life of older Aboriginal Australians.
3. Understand the steps required to develop an assessment tool that is valid for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
4. Administer and interpret the KICA appropriately.
5. Describe some top tips, useful strategies and activities for working with people with dementia.

Presenters

Dr Kate Smith

Dr Kate Smith

Dr Kate Smith is a Wadjella Occupational Therapist and Research Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Medical and Dental Health, University of WA. She has coordinated a number of Aboriginal ageing research studies in remote, rural and urban regions since 2003, including those on Aboriginal dementia assessment, prevalence, and protective/ risk factors; Aboriginal community care models; carer wellbeing and empowerment; and the development of quality of life package with older Aboriginal Australians. Her PhD work on the development of an Indigenous cognitive assessment tool (the KICA) has been replicated internationally.


Lianne Gilchrist

Lianne Gilchrist

Lianne Gilchrist is a Yamatji woman from the Ingarda language group in the North West of Australia. She is an Occupational Therapist, working as a Research Officer at the Centre for Aboriginal Medical and Dental Health (CAMDH) at the University of Western Australia (UWA), developing an overall package for service providers to assess and address the wellbeing needs of older Aboriginal people living in urban areas.

CONNECTION - Assessment Yarning – Proppa ways for assessing our kids – Presented by Tara Lewis

Overview

Assessing the developmental abilities of First Nations children has become a contentious issue over the years with some researchers advocating for non-standard forms of assessments and others the continued use of standardized assessments. Whilst there continues to be debate surrounding culturally responsive assessment practices, First Nations people through both my research and the 2017 NAIDOC Theme; ‘Our Languages Matter’ are stating that maintaining our way of communicating is important as it is the vehicle for our culture knowledge and identity. Therefore, we as allied health professionals need to acknowledge and adapt our assessment processes and practices to ensure they cater for First Nations people’s ways of communicating. This interactive 1.5hour workshop will provide participants with the knowledge and skills to use yarning as an assessment methodology to ensure we are truly connecting and understanding First Nations clients. This workshop is aimed at allied health professionals from varying disciplines as well as students and supervisory clinicians.

Learning objectives:

By the end of the workshop, participants will have:

  • an understanding of Aboriginal English and it’s function
  • an understanding of yarning and its importance to First Nations peoples
  • the skills and knowledge to engage in yarning as an assessment methodology

Presenter:

Tara Lewis

Tara Lewis

Tara is an Iman woman from Queensland. She grew up in Brisbane where she completed her Bachelor of Speech Pathology. Tara is the senior speech pathologist at the Institute for Urban Indigenous Health where she supports other allied health practioners in providing culturally responsive services. Tara is also a PhD candidate at the University of QLD where she is privileging Indigenous voices to understand the values and aspirations First Nations people have surround communication. Tara has also developed a culturally responsive methodology for assessing First Nations children; assessment yarning and has developed a communication assessment called Gumerri that utilises cultural stories and follows and values Aboriginal ways of communicating.

COLLABORATION - Closing the Gap Refresh - Presented by Sam Jeffries

Workshop aim

The workshop aims to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are meaningfully engaged in the Closing the Gap Refresh process.

Learning outcomes

At the completion of the workshop, participants will have:

  • Greater awareness of the Closing the Gap Refresh process
  • Knowledge of what is needed to support Indigenous community leadership and decision- making
  • Knowledge of how governments, communities, organisations, businesses and other stakeholders can work more effectively together
  • Greater awareness of what is needed to change the relationship between governments and communities
  • An understanding of what resources, including data, are needed to help communities drive local action

Presenter

Sam Jeffries

Sam Jeffries

Sam Jeffries is a proud Mooraworri/Wiradjuri man. Born and raised in Brewarrina NSW.

He has spent practically all his life in north western NSW, having long term involvement in the development of responsible leadership, community development, and developing regional and community governance models. He has co-authored two Indigenous policy journals on Indigenous Community Governance and Leadership, published by Jumbunna Indigenous House of Learning, University of Technology Sydney, written papers on national representation, and written and presented many speeches on public policy matters relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Sam led Aboriginal regional governance structures in Western NSW for two decades. Murdi Paaki (muddy parky) Regional Council (ATSIC) and Murdi Paaki (muddy parky) Regional Assembly MPRA (post ATSIC), were and have been at the forefront for collaborative arrangements between Aboriginal Peoples and Australian and NSW Governments around the delivery of services and programs.

Sam was part of the federal governments Expert Panel on Constitutional Recognition for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People 2011-12

This work has led Sam into his current position in the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet as the Special Adviser for Regional Governance Indigenous Affairs.

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